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Playing a chord with a raised fifth on Stradella bass

dunlustin

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I wasn't going to add any more but as jeffj has expanded on my suggestion:
Two things-
1.) For an alternative, see end of the line where an A7 is suggested again with the c# in the melody - tho' I quite like the sound of the maj7 having tried it on the piano.
2.)Further in the tune (section in A ) An A chord is followed by an A6: an A chord and the melody note f# - a version of A6.
Otherwise an F#min is also close by.
Hope this is useful.
 

Pipemajor

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Thanks, Jeff and dunlustin.
I think I was suffering from tunnel vision and believed everything there to be gospel.
I suppose the chords could have been added by someone other than Passarini as I believe he played mainly the little Italian organettos so there would be no reason for him to write down the chords.
I did try various other chords and eventually settled on F#m but I will go back and try the other suggestions.
 

Steve

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This is an altered chord. Uses the altered scale, a substitute for a mixolydian scale.
D Eb F F# G# Bb C D
The chord is D F# Bb C Eb
It is the seventh mode of the melodic minor, Eb melodic minor
Suggest book by Dan Haerle "Scales for Jazz Improvisation"
Can get on Amazon or www.jazzbooks.com
 

AccordionUprising

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A useful source for complex accordion chords is accocrdionchords.com

I like that chord combinations for the Stradella base system are well illustrated and easily understood.
Attached is the CHORD CHART from the website.

Unfortunately, the site does not have a suggestion for playing a raised fifth, as queried in the initial post.
I had not seen https://accordionchords.com (typo in your post?)

That's a pretty neat layout for learning the different chords. 👍🏼
 

Lucio76

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I know you have already figure out the solution but I would add some details:

In Italy, a DMaJ7th is also called "Re settima più" which literally means "D seventh plus" and corresponds in symbols to Re7+ and then D7+.

So I can confirm that D7+ is actually DMaj7th.

Ruggero Passarini, the author of that valse, has what we call an "orchestra da ballo", basically a "band" that plays for dancers. Usually, when bands like this have scores of their music, they print several versions of the same piece. Usually, there's the version in Eb for alto sax, in Bb for trumpet or tenor sax, there's a score for piano, for accordion and there's also a more generic score for "Strumenti in DO" which means that is a score for all instruments that play in C (guitar, piano, accordion, flute, and violin). This is why there're some complex chords on "Valentino". If it had been an accordion score there would have been just a D major instead of the DMaj7 (D, F#, A, C#).

DMaj7 can be played by combining a D bass with an F#min chord but it works better on a less strict rhythm pattern than a waltz since bass and chords are not played simultaneously. I'm quite sure that Passarini doesn't use combined chords playing this waltz.

(Sorry for my bad English!!)
 

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