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Repeated notes - same fingers or different

pentaprism

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When I took piano-forte lessons, I was taught to use different (alternating) fingers for repeated notes.

I'm not so sure about accordion, in particular chromatic button accordion. How do you do it?
 

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JIM D.

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The same way !!
 

Zevy

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<FONT font=Garamond><SIZE size=125>Using different fingers will ensure a clean and even execution of these notes. You dont have to do it that way, but try it both methods; you will see what I mean.
Good luck!
 

Glenn

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I agree with Zevy and Jim . Which fingers and how many and in what order will be a function of what note or finger you are coming from, what note you are going to and your ability. Ability you can practice, the others are a bit limited by the music you are playing.
 
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goldtopia

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I use to play piano before moving over to accordion. The notes of a piano have decaying sustain when you you use the right peddle. Whareas the accordion has no sustain which means the note has to be held longer to the value of the note. Because of this I use the same finger instead alternating fingers that you would do on a piano. I have rigged up a 2 octave midi keyboard with a pianobox2 next to the accordion that has 128 different instrument sounds. This I play with alternating fingers as on a piano for the same note using a peddlle for decaying sustain for the piano or harpsichord instruments. I have found its better than having a midii accordion that does not have any sustain in the way that an electronic or accoustic piano has. I can play the accordion bass buttons and play the keyboard next to me for one of a range of instruments at the same time as the accvordion bass.
The accordion is an accoustic 72 pass 2 voice Pigini. also I have a lighter accousic 32 bass Royal Stanrdard for when my shoulder starts aching..
 

pentaprism

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I'm still undecided.

My brain says alternating fingers is better. But in practice, I find it's more comfortable using the same finger.

I think I need some more time to practice either way.....
 
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simonking

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Depends whether you mean fast as possible or 'normal' speed repeated notes??
 
M

maugein96

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Hi,

One of France's most popular CBA players, Aimable, often used his forefinger only for repeat notes on the same button. However, he had a fairly unique staccato style of playing that would be regarded as very old fashioned these days. The modern set are all thumbs and legato stuff with the occasional button trill (with different fingers), as if to pay lip service to the traditional musette style.

No doubt other older players did the same, but in the absence of video proof I would have to say that Aimable was the only player I've actually seen using that single finger method.

So, if you want to play like Aimable (if you've ever heard of him) then use a single finger, but it seems that the overwhelming majority of both PA and CBA players have been schooled to use alternating fingers. As far as I can remember from the various French and Italian CBA method books I've looked at, where the subject of repeat notes on the same button is covered at all, then alternate fingering is advocated.

If you want to get really fast then try using just your fore and middle fingers. The use of the ring finger in addition to the 1st an 2nd fingers can often slow things down a bit, particularly with the smaller French buttons, if your accordion has those. I've watched some PA players trilling with all 5 right hand fingers, and it is very effective. However, if you try that with the little French CBA buttons you're almost certain to miss the button with one finger and/or struggle to find the correct button for the next note. If you have large hands there is also the risk of hitting two buttons at once.

French CBA with its smaller buttons has its advantages and disadvantages, although I appreciate that most forum users who play CBA have accordions with the larger button size and spacing.
 

Soulsaver

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For me, on PA, alternate fingers; but as Glenn says, it depends on the note before and the note after.. and how many repeats.
 
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goldtopia

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Yes I agree. the fore and afternotes makes a difference. You have to end up on the right finger otherwise it means crossing over which is very awkward. Accordions and pianos are of course quite different. when I changed from piano to accordion .I found that right hand techniques had to change in many instances as well as getting use to a verticle keyboard. These accordions are curious beast and yet we love them. This is why I say pianists have got it easy.
 
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Russ

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I agree you should practice both fingerings and then choose the one that is best. Check out the fingerings on pages 32-34 in Gallianos book - each page uses different fingerings for same notes -
 

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