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Looking for Advice on getting an Accordion

E

E_S_P

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Hello,

Im a jazz piano player, located in USA (New England), whos looking at getting an accordion. Ive had some experience playing them but they were all smaller models. I have a particular sound (see link) Im looking at getting and would like to see if anyone can help me in selecting the right accordion.


If you listen to this track from Teo Macero, it features the fantastic Orlando Di Girolamo (his playing starts around 40 seconds in). This is the sound I am looking to get in an accordion.

Im looking for a full size. It can be new, used or vintage. I have worked on all sorts of vintage instruments, so Im not afraid of buying something older. Id very much appreciate any recommendations.

Thanks you so much!
 

debra

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Not a great sample as the accordion is completely overpowered by the other instruments...
For jazz it seems that a keyboard that extends to the high C is preferred because jazz players use the L register a lot (possibly in combination with M or H) and then the higher you can go the better. A normal "full size" accordion has 41 keys, going from F to A, but a jazz model can for instance go from G to C, with 42 keys. Cassotto is also very desirable for jazz sound.
 
E

E_S_P

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Thank you.

Here is another example from the same album, a clearer solo:

 
M

maugein96

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Hi,

Best thing to do is try and find a pic of Orlando playing his accordion then post it on here so that somebody can get a look at it, and hopefully identify the make and model. The make is usually the easy bit, as several models can look outwardly identical.

As Paul says, unfortunately the accordion in the first clip is just about inaudible over the other instruments.

It might be as well to bear in mind that no two accordions will sound exactly the same, due to the way they are constructed, but if you can obtain an accordion that was the same as Orlando played you have a start.

I don't know very much about jazz accordions at all, but different players obviously played different types.

The accordion in the second clip has quite a "sharp" sound for a jazz instrument, and no doubt somebody on here will be able to hazard a guess as to what kind of reeds/tuning he used.
 

debra

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E_S_P post_id=63218 time=1538059426 user_id=3192 said:
Thank you.

Here is another example from the same album, a clearer solo:


A bit clearer, but still dominated by the sax. Sounds like the LH register is used but hard to tell what type of accordion. You definitely need an instrument that has L, M and H for jazz, and tremolo (in MM) is pretty much irrelevant, maybe even not desirable at all to give you more register options without tremolo.
Generally trying to imitate someone elses sound is likely to be less successful than developing your own sound.
 

Stephen Hawkins

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Hi ESP,

My general disinterest in jazz music makes me the just about worst person to give you advice. All I can really tell you is that I agree wholeheartedly with Paul. You should develop a style which is unique to you, rather than copy anyone else. (however good they are)

Good Luck,

Stephen.
 

JerryPH

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If you are in the New England area, why dont you visit the worlds largest privately owned collection of accordions? Its called the NEAM and is in in Canaan CT. They also sell used and new accordions and have them in all sizes. If you go, tell him Jerry from Montreal suggested this place to you. ;)

Even if you purchase nothing, you will see some amazing accordion history and meet Paul, one heck of a good man doing something really special... and the accordion museum is FREE to walk in to and enjoy.
 
E

E_S_P

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Thank you so much Jerry! I'm not too far away from there, so I'll plan a trip.

It's probably a better idea for me to just play so more accordions until I find that sound I'm looking for. Perhaps, he'd have some advice as well.

Really appreciate it!
 

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