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Bugari Evo demo!

JIM D.

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There are fellow accordionist's & members here that prefer an acoustic box for practice & entertaining.
Of course I respect their preferences and enjoy playing my own acoustic accordions.
I've owned models of Roland digital accordions for 15 years now and come to realize that in 98% of my
performances, audiences & fellow musicians prefer me entertaining with a digital. There are exceptions
as if the group I work with has a bass & guitar player, well I prefer using an acoustic.
There are other benefits with a digital as a duo will sound like a trio, a trio will sound like a quartet and so on.
We all have preferences and I respect them. But you must admit that these YouTube digital performances with their
digital expansion sounds are VERY ENTERTAINING !!
 

Keymn

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JIM D. said:
There are fellow accordionist's & members here that prefer an acoustic box for practice & entertaining.
Of course I respect their preferences and enjoy playing my own acoustic accordions.
I've owned models of Roland digital accordions for 15 years now and come to realize that in 98% of my
performances, audiences & fellow musicians prefer me entertaining with a digital. There are exceptions
as if the group I work with has a bass & guitar player, well I prefer using an acoustic.
There are other benefits with a digital as a duo will sound like a trio, a trio will sound like a quartet and so on.
We all have preferences and I respect them. But you must admit that these YouTube digital performances with their
digital expansion sounds are VERY ENTERTAINING !!

Digital for us elders make it easy, especially adjusting the bellow pressure. I do not think I could go all night with an acoustic anymore. Connectivity is so much easier on digital. I do not depend on digital Accordion settings, have about 4 or 5 I use. Doing lots of things on arranger keyboards...that makes it fun to connect to the Roland. Making and arranging sets on the Korg pa1000 is my venture now. That new version PaManager V4 Software is awesome.
But gigging with accordion/arranger as of now 3 days a week...need not more...a retirement dream come true...
 

Dingo40

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Hi guys!

Thanks for responding! :)

While I myself don't own any digital instruments ( too cheap, I guess  :p), I can see many good points in their favour and absolutely enjoy their performances! :)

Digital vs acoustic reminds me of an episode in " Midsomer Murders" where in the pro- halide and the pro-digital rivalry played a large and entertaining part in the story. :)
 
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maugein96

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Dingo40 pid=72527 dateline=1591095041 said:
Another take: :)


Dingo,

Had one of my usual short stories for you, but youll be grateful the site crashed temporarily and I lost the lot. 

Anyway for those who want a poke at the Bugari Evo, this is the best example I could find from Romania:-


With the cloth ears I now possess I couldnt tell whether Emile was playing an acoustic or a digital, but I know that many on here could. 

Digital instruments seem to suit Balkan type music, but the Evo in your clips is pretty much spot on for the styles concerned. 

Whats all the fuss about? Just play and let play. 

Digital guitar from Mostar in Hercegovina, with acoustic accordion. Just cut it if you dont like it, preferably before Nedeljiko starts singing. I love the music but the vocals can be a bit overpowering. Dont think old Ned is still on the go, as hes not in the current line up. 

 

jozz

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maugein96 said:
Just cut it if you don't like it, preferably before Nedeljiko starts singing. I love the music but the vocals can be a bit overpowering.

this is gold

anyway, digital accordions have their own purposes

I largely agree with Jim, I would try to use one to fatten up the sound, hopefully quite subtly. I still have never tried one, and I guess if it 'felt' right I could own one. Especially for silent practice.
 

Dingo40

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Thanks for responding, guys. :)

John,
Thanks for the clips. Sorry we didn't get your stories  :-/, but I know what you mean by the site crashing: ran into that myself :p.

All this digitalisation reminds me of a sewing exposition I attended (to humour my wife).

One section of the expo was occupied by a series of "sewers" (as in needle and thread) enjoying tea and cake, while the digitalised sewing machines industriously got on with a variety of complicated stitching and embroidery, by themselves! :huh:

I guess, that's the coming future of instrumental music: a bunch of instruments playing themselves, while the musicians sit around having coffee and cake! :p
 
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maugein96

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Dingo40 said:
Thanks for responding, guys. :)

John,
Thanks for the clips. Sorry we didn't get your stories  :-/, but I know what you mean by the site crashing: ran into that myself :p.

All this digitalisation reminds me of a sewing exposition I attended (to humour my wife).

One section of the expo was occupied by a series of "sewers" (as in needle and thread) enjoying tea and cake, while the digitalised sewing machines industriously got on with a variety of complicated stitching and embroidery, by themselves! :huh:

I guess, that's the coming future of instrumental music: a bunch of instruments playing themselves, while the musicians sit around having coffee and cake! :p

I've posted self playing digital accordions on here made by Decap in Belgium. They work like a juke box. Make your selection with the correct input code and away you go. I actually like the sound of those, but wish they made them so they always finished a tune with the bellows closed. Spoils the whole experience.  

Never trust women who are members of sewing clubs. They'll stitch you up.
 

Dingo40

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Very good, John! :)


Thanks for reminding me about these, John ( Id forgotten :p)

Here we are then:
Forget the Bugari Evo.
Forget the Roland Rxx
Heres the very thing for your next ceildih evening: it plays while you enjoy the beer and chat up the chicks! :)


And...its a Crucianelli! :)
 

Morne

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maugein96 pid=72540 dateline=1591173738 said:
Ive posted self playing digital accordions on here made by Decap in Belgium. They work like a juke box. Make your selection with the correct input code and away you go. I actually like the sound of those, but wish they made them so they always finished a tune with the bellows closed. Spoils the whole experience.  

John, that problem has already been solved:
[video=youtube]
That gives you all the advantages of self-playability but also closeability, as demonstrated so elegantly at the end.
The only real downside is you need some very rare Cold War-era Soviet technology.


Heres a more modern version from 2011 (that earlier one is from 1987 apparently):
[video=youtube]
 

debra

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I watched these demos. I specifically want the accordion sound. For that it's nice that in this demo they play through the built-in speakers and record that instead of plugging in a jack. When plugged in the Evo is just a Roland. But unplugged you can hear what the wooden box does and I must say in the demo the accordion sounds are clearly better than what I have often heard from a Roland. Very interesting because the electronics is the same.
Of course it's not a surprise that the box really matters. That is true for acoustic accordions as well.
 
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maugein96

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Hi Morne,

Amazing! We had them on planet Zorg, but the cables at the front were of a slightly different colour, and we never had to strap them on. They were called Zorgordions. That would have been about 17,000 years ago just before my 173rd daughter was born. They said they would never catch on, but they frequently did. All those wires were a real hazard. 

Earth is a far more interesting place than people think, and it seems some of my people must have shown the guy in the clip how to make them. Unless they restore budget travel to Zorg soon, where I can get the medication I need, I've only got another 497 years to live, and I'm worried that I'll never see one of those contraptions again. 

Thanks Morne, for a truly out of this world experience. Happy to have finally got "closure" on something that had been troubling me for a very long time.
 

Alan Sharkis

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Hello debra said:
I watched these demos. I specifically want the accordion sound. For that it's nice that in this demo they play through the built-in speakers and record that instead of plugging in a jack. When plugged in the Evo is just a Roland. But unplugged you can hear what the wooden box does and I must say in the demo the accordion sounds are clearly better than what I have often heard from a Roland. Very interesting because the electronics is the same.
Of course it's not a surprise that the box really matters. That is true for acoustic accordions as well.

Hello Paul,

A couple of summers ago I had a chance to try an Evo, and then try a Roland FR-8x. Like you, I found the sound of the Evo more natural and less electronic than the 8x. That was at Petosa, where the gentlemen who demo’d the Evo played it before handing it to me to try. He, like so many others, attributed the sound of the Evo to its wooden case. But another accordion dealer I know, who has an Evo in his showroom and has played it, had another explanation. He said that there was little to no resonance in the Evo’s wooden case. Given that the Evo’s speakers and amplifiers were identical to those in the 8x, he attributed the difference in sound to the size and shape of the speaker enclosure, namely the space inside the treble grille, and, to a lesser degree, the space behind the bass board. 

Both that other dealer’s explanation and the usual one with the wooden case make some sense to me, assuming that there is some resonance in the wooden case of the Evo. I can’t be sure, because my experience and my recollection of it is two years old, but I think I did detect some vibration in the case of the Evo, which would indicate that the case was resonating. But I also know that speaker enclosure size and shape can affect sound. 

What convinced me not to buy the Evo arose from a direct comparison of the Evo’s specs versus those of the 8x. Roland, it seems, didn’t allow the Evo to have all the features of the 8x. As it turned out, I wound up buying neither accordion because of their carrying weights. Instead, I bought a Roland FR-4x.

Marco Cingalia promised a new line of digital accordions from Proxima with wooden cases made by Italian companies (I presume Bugari will be one) and electronics designed by Proxima, not Roland. Because of the way that the Coronavirus affected Italy, I suppose there will be a long delay before those of us in the United States can try them.
 
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maugein96

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Dingo40 pid=72543 dateline=1591178686 said:
Very good, John! :)


Thanks for reminding me about these, John ( Id forgotten :p)

Here we are then:
Forget the Bugari Evo.
Forget the Roland Rxx
Heres the very thing for your next ceildih evening: it plays while you enjoy the beer and chat up the chicks! :)


And...its a Crucianelli! :)



Hi Dingo,

Never been to a ceilidh in my life, as my religion forbade all such enjoyment. Drink, dancing, and bright coloured clothing were still a bit risque as late as my fathers generation, and had been totally taboo in the generation before. 

When I finally took my mothers Irish familys advice to kick the religious bit into touch I discovered I hadnt time to chat up the chicks, as the pubs all closed at 10.00pm, and in any case chicks werent allowed in public bars in Scotland until I was well into my 20s. The other issue was the only ceilis in our area were Irish and there werent enough bandages in the house to patch me up had I ventured into such an Irish ceili as a disciple of Calvin. Couldnt even go into the Polish club to hear the polkas on the accordion for the same reason.

Any time I went home smelling of drink it was a saucepan over the head by the wee Irishwoman that was my mother. She was obliged to change religion so she could marry my father, and must have been looking forward to an easy life in a household of teetotallers. She would shout Its not your friend who gives you drink!, in between strikes with the saucepan, and that probably explains why I am not quite right in the head these days!

Loved the clip. So thats what Scottish ceilidh music sounds like? Glad I now live in England!  ;)

Id better point out that not all of Scotland makes such a big issue out of religion. There were at least half a dozen people in our village of 1900 people who paid no heed to the religious bigotry in our area at all. They were all Asian shopkeepers!
 
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maugein96

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Dingo40 said:
Excellent story, John!
Very droll.
Thanks! :)

Dingo,

The whole thing is rather complicated and I've gone into it before. 

Suffice to say that the teachings of a French guy named Jean Calvin played a very large part in it all, and I now cannot even remember which football (soccer) team he played for. Certainly wasn't Bordeaux, as there is a strong connection with alcohol there. I believe he was once offered a transfer to A.S. Roma, but he declined for some reason!
 

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