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Roland accordion prices in United States?

Ventura

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well the used prices go up and down, but the basic FR3 FR2 FR1
outside of the strap attachment problems and DC connector are
actually very reliable once they have burned in

just keep an eye open for a good deal within driving distance...
you can set your Craigslist to search within X miles from a zip code
and eBay can sort from your Zipcode too

eventually you will spot something at the right price targets
fr3x = 2000
fr3 = 1500
fr 2 or 1 = 1000
 
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Alan Sharkis

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lets extrapolate from a comonly available technology...
Casio keyboards
light up keys that you can follow to learn to play
multiple easy play assist functions and backgrounds
100's of songs built in
great sound from interal speakers and amps
true to life orchestral tones and drums
ridiculously inexpensive ($99 - $150)

just put these guts into a accordion shaped object that can be
squeezed for volume/intensity of the treble sounds
I like what you said, except for the keys that light up. If we're going to have a vertical piano keyboard on the right hand side and we're taught not to look at the keys, what good is keys that light up?;)

But seriously, you may be on the right track.
 

JeffJetton

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but without any bellows at all.

Yes, I'm quoting myself, just to make sure this point didn't get missed. :)

True, if you want something like a Roland V-Accordion (where the target market is mainly people who already own/play accordion), but cheaper, you'd want bellows of some sort.

But I'm advocating for something a little different. The target markets here are 1) people completely new to accordion who want to "test the waters" without gambling a lot of money, and 2) accordion players who want something inexpensive/portable/light they can practice a bit on, perhaps with headphones on in the middle of the night.

Once you get rid of the bellows, the whole thing gets a lot easier to make. Now you're really in the neighborhood of that $50 department store Casio keyboard. The beginner can learn how to work the keys and buttons and get their hand independence going. More importantly, they can decide whether or not to eventually upgrade to the real thing.

Again, this is just like a practice chanter is to the bagpipes. They're not the real thing, but still, beginners use them to learn the fingerings and coordination first, and then later (if they enjoy it) upgrade to a version of the instrument where they finally get to manage a big air pump. And even experts use practice chanters sometimes for the convenience and relative quiet.

Think of the commitment someone has to make to become an accordion player now, and the hoops they have to jump through just to start out. Now imagine that they could pick up one of these "practicordions" at Target or Walmart (or whatever the across-the-pond equivalent would be) for the price of a video game. The resulting demand for real accordions from the percentage who "caught the bug" from the starter gadget could potentially be significant, and that would benefit us all.
 

Alan Sharkis

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Yes, I'm quoting myself, just to make sure this point didn't get missed. :)

True, if you want something like a Roland V-Accordion (where the target market is mainly people who already own/play accordion), but cheaper, you'd want bellows of some sort.

But I'm advocating for something a little different. The target markets here are 1) people completely new to accordion who want to "test the waters" without gambling a lot of money, and 2) accordion players who want something inexpensive/portable/light they can practice a bit on, perhaps with headphones on in the middle of the night.

Once you get rid of the bellows, the whole thing gets a lot easier to make. Now you're really in the neighborhood of that $50 department store Casio keyboard. The beginner can learn how to work the keys and buttons and get their hand independence going. More importantly, they can decide whether or not to eventually upgrade to the real thing.

Again, this is just like a practice chanter is to the bagpipes. They're not the real thing, but still, beginners use them to learn the fingerings and coordination first, and then later (if they enjoy it) upgrade to a version of the instrument where they finally get to manage a big air pump. And even experts use practice chanters sometimes for the convenience and relative quiet.

Think of the commitment someone has to make to become an accordion player now, and the hoops they have to jump through just to start out. Now imagine that they could pick up one of these "practicordions" at Target or Walmart (or whatever the across-the-pond equivalent would be) for the price of a video game. The resulting demand for real accordions from the percentage who "caught the bug" from the starter gadget could potentially be significant, and that would benefit us all.
 

Alan Sharkis

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What about this modular concept, again with no bellows until, perhaps, the final evolution:

1. It starts off with a treble keyboard of 25 keys, a bass side with 12 buttons and sensors in the bass strap for pull and in the bass cover for squeeze. It's digital.

2. Intermediate plug-in additions for either 34/72 or 37/96 or some other configurations can be installed as kits by the user, teacher, whatever.

3. Final plug-ins for 41/120. At this stage, bellows with bi-directional bellows pressure sensors can be installed, although this may have to be done at a service facility.

Just wondering ...
 

Ventura

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if i remember right, the first Elkavox (organ accordion)
had fake bellows on a lower pivot that simply acted as your volume control

i think Sano had a similar model setup at some point

Farfisa had a transistor (transivox) version but i never
played one so not sure what the "bellows" setup was
 

Giovanni

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if i remember right, the first Elkavox (organ accordion)
had fake bellows on a lower pivot that simply acted as your volume control

i think Sano had a similar model setup at some point

Farfisa had a transistor (transivox) version but i never
played one so not sure what the "bellows" setup was
I actually owned a Farfisa Transivox in the mid 1970's it was traditional accordion with electronics, volume control of the electronic section was via a foot controlled swell pedal , the Accordion bellows worked as normal accordion bellows . happy times and many fond memories of gigs ....Eventually sold the Transivox in 1980 to buy the Farfisa Synthaccordion
 

Ventura

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you had some good equipment !

the SynthAccordion was certainly the pinnacle of the OrganAccordions...
it was unfortunate that the era was ending just about then. Beyond
Farfisa there really was never another fully engineered Cordovox Style box.

here in the Wash DC area, a teacher by the name of Merv Conn was also
the "organist" for the Washington Senators baseball team... the fans in
the stands never really knew he was using a SynthAccordion
 

Giovanni

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I always wanted to own a Cordovox like a CG5/6/7 with the leslie type speaker .The Cordovox in the UK price wise cost nearly as much as an average house !!! believe me I'm not joking !! in the 1970's
I was lucky to be a friend of Valentino brilliant player , musician and cabaret artist . He had one and it was customized for him to his own spec sound wise by a Lowry organ techie specialist in London called Bill Dunn. the sound was absolutely awesome..........I played it many times i have never forgotten the experience ....All wonderful memories of great times !!
 

Giovanni

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Yes I played that instrument many times ..... his CV is outstanding .toured and appeared with Beatles , Dusty Springfield , shirley Bassey ,Alma Cogan , Gracie fields ,Matt Monro Tom jones , Robert Farnon Orchestra ,to name just a few , 20 tours on QE2 cruise liner , Las Vegas , it was the Legend Dick Contino that suggested he should use the name Mr Cordovox , even played for Frank Sinatra at a special exclusive party at the White house , Frank Sinatra was a guest and not scheduled to perform !! Frank was asked to sing My Way and valentino backed him . the only accordionist to appear in Cabaret at the Talk of the Town in London and he performed there many times .He is also a superb Pianist .
 

Tom

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Wow, thanks Jerry! Never sern tjis guy begore. Amazing!
 

Simon Max

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There is a FR-1 on eBay going now for $650. Please note that this is the oldest FR1 model, no USB connection and probably the worst bellows response. Bellows shake is not possible on this one.
Simon
 

JerryPH

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There is a FR-1 on eBay going now for $650. Please note that this is the oldest FR1 model, no USB connection and probably the worst bellows response. Bellows shake is not possible on this one.
Simon
Bellows shakes are near impossible on almost all V-accordions. :)
 

Ventura

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the way i demonstrated a polka shake on the fr7 was to simply set the echo to do it for me and save it as a patch...
you just get the timing of the echo right for the intended song, then each time i hit a key ( or chord ) on the rh side, you heard me play the note, and lifting off the keys you heard the echo... doing this repeatedly in time you really couldn't tell if you were in the next room
 

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