• If you haven't done so already, please add a location to your profile. This helps when people are trying to assist you, suggest resources, etc. Thanks

Recommendations for traditional folk music retreat

saundersbp

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 2, 2018
Messages
865
Reaction score
1,554
Location
Yorkshire UK
Does anyone have any recommendations for a traditional/folk retreat in UK? I'm interested at the moment in Irish traditional music, less keen on traditional Irish weather.....
 
Chase @hais1273 think he does something around Hadleigh way...may be more french Breton though....just idea
 
I suppose anything is possible - sure only the other day the farmer's horse was found in the byre... But just in case you don't find Irish traditional music at folk camp, maybe pack your handkerchiefs and Morris sticks, in case you are asked up to dance. 🤣

If you decide to brave the Irish weather (that would likely be milder than in Yorkshire) maybe you could consider checking out the Blas International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance. There's the Willie Clancy Summer School (apparently the largest traditional music summer school held annually since 1973). Failing that there's always plenty of music in Irish sessions - everywhere. Oh, don't forget Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann - that would be mighty fun too. Last year there were nearly 500,000 visitors at the festival. :)
 
The farmer's horse was found in the byre? I imagine that means it's still winter. Anyway seems like a good name for a traditional tune.
 
The farmer's horse was found in the byre? I imagine that means it's still winter. Anyway seems like a good name for a traditional tune.
Nice one Tom; you've hit very close to the Scottish traditional tune 'the mucking' o Geordie's byre'. Translated into English this comes out as 'the cleansing of George's cow-shed'.
 
Nice one Tom; you've hit very close to the Scottish traditional tune 'the mucking' o Geordie's byre'. Translated into English this comes out as 'the cleansing of George's cow-shed'.
Thanks Box! Seems like I have heard the word "byre", but probably would have gone with, like a shelter with roof, but no sides. Anyway, gonna have look for that tune....
 
In early May Skolvan from Brittany will be at the Hadleigh folk club for a weekend of music and dance. Music workshops, Dance workshops plus two " Fest Noz"and a session and "Fest Deiz" on the Sunday. Regis Huiban is Skolvan's accordionist. He's worth a hunt down on YT. I guess most of this will be hard-core Breton, Gavotte, Plin, various Larides, Loudeac etc etc etc. Just the occasional Irish tune for Chapelloise and Cercle Circasian. Not sure if we'll be going my wife's health ain't that great.....
 
I just noticed The University of West London (London College of Music Examinations) have a syllabus for both Irish Traditional Music and Scottish Traditional Music.
Thank you, I haven't ever done a music exam and not going to start now but the syllabus with repertoire was very interesting reading. To my horror the tunes I've been learning are in the G6-8 area. Had I looked first I'd have more wisely started at G1 !
as this may be in your neck of the woods it might worth checking Les Panards Dansent. There's a French/Breton session or two in the Leeds area
Thanks again. Hebden Bridge isn't a million miles away and is a nice place when it's not flooded. I've been listening to a few country's traditions and to my ears the Irish comes up on top, why though they have to play everything insanely fast beats me. Going to go to my first session tonight in a local pub just to listen and perhaps make surreptitious notes.

There's also a Scandinavian traditional music thing up this way in a few months called Scandimoot, very specialised!
 
Thank you, I haven't ever done a music exam and not going to start now but the syllabus with repertoire was very interesting reading. To my horror the tunes I've been learning are in the G6-8 area. Had I looked first I'd have more wisely started at G1 !
If you enjoy the challenge of technically demanding traditional tunes let me know. I have a few rare and special Scottish tunes that might be a bit... interesting.
 
Thanks Box! Seems like I have heard the word "byre", but probably would have gone with, like a shelter with roof, but no sides. Anyway, gonna have look for that tune....
Tom, I associated the word ‘byre’ as being Scottish but on checking the Encyclopaedia Brittanica it lists it as a ‘British’ word. For me its a 4-walled building with a roof.
The tune is a very traditional one embedded in the Scottish culture and I believe first appeared as a tune called ‘The Linton Ploughman’.
The nonsense song called ‘The Muckin’ o’ Geordie’s Byre’ was set to that tune and tells the hilarious story of the that event. The tune also appears in 3/4 time as ‘Bonnie Strathyre’ a song praising the beauty and tranquility of that Perthshire village.
I used this 'shorthand' version of the tune for years in my band:

LintonPlough.jpeg
 
Tom, I associated the word ‘byre’ as being Scottish but on checking the Encyclopaedia Brittanica it lists it as a ‘British’ word. For me its a 4-walled building with a roof.
The tune is a very traditional one embedded in the Scottish culture and I believe first appeared as a tune called ‘The Linton Ploughman’.
The nonsense song called ‘The Muckin’ o’ Geordie’s Byre’ was set to that tune and tells the hilarious story of the that event. The tune also appears in 3/4 time as ‘Bonnie Strathyre’ a song praising the beauty and tranquility of that Perthshire village.
I used this 'shorthand' version of the tune for years in my band:

LintonPlough.jpeg
Thanks again! Wow, that's a lot of chords for a "simple" tune!
 
Last edited:
Tom, I associated the word ‘byre’ as being Scottish but on checking the Encyclopaedia Brittanica it lists it as a ‘British’ word. For me its a 4-walled building with a roof.
The tune is a very traditional one embedded in the Scottish culture and I believe first appeared as a tune called ‘The Linton Ploughman’.
The nonsense song called ‘The Muckin’ o’ Geordie’s Byre’ was set to that tune and tells the hilarious story of the that event. The tune also appears in 3/4 time as ‘Bonnie Strathyre’ a song praising the beauty and tranquility of that Perthshire village.
I used this 'shorthand' version of the tune for years in my band:

LintonPlough.jpeg
Also the same tune as "Westering Home"
 
Back
Top