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I may have found the one.

Mr Mark

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Further exploration has revealed that it is not a fifth in the bass section, rather a full 5 octaves when playing bass and counterbass, while the chord notes have three octaves. The piccolo is just subtle enough to pique curiosity without being annoying.

This is where I was saying above that the overall tonal balance of the reed selection in terms of timbre and tone is about as good as I have heard - which is saying at least a little something as I have definitely owned a lot of higher end accordions than this with similar piccolo on the bass but not so complimentary. Side track note : I assume these are piccolo being the bass range is G1, G2, G3, G4, G5 so the piccolo is G5? Is there such thing as range relating to reed naming or again is that an accordion manufacturer free for all sort of thing?

The 7th buttons are indeed playing a seventh without the root (eg. A7=E C# G). I am aware of how this can be used to produce the diminished one row above (in conjunction with the root note of the row above) but I do not use that at all in my music (I am not that far along with my theory alas). Curious then, does a 96 bass typically play the root note on a seventh button then? Or again the free for all I suppose o_O :LOL:.

From my limited experience with adding a quint, I have found that arrangement, limiting. I have only found it useful on the piano side when performing solo passages, and only certain types of music, so I'm happy not to have that going on.

Good chord site for shore!

I have had good experience with Wilson Music in the past, my plan is to email a variety of places and see what's out there.
Isn't your Hohner from a later date? This is my Hohner Tango. I always thought mine was from the late thirties. I had it restored and it sounds great.

Sorry Richard. My meaning was more along the lines of do you find this feature of value in your playing and or does it make the accordion lighter in weight etc, not how do you physically find it.

Do you mean that the bass chords have an extra note? That might be from before it became standard to leave out the 5th note from the 7th and dim chord buttons. I knew somebody who had an accordion like that which might have been from the late 30s or so. It didn't sound good when they tried jazzy chord combinations.

Clever players started clipping those notes out with pliers. It became standard to leave them out as time went on. I'm not sure exactly when this started, or when the new standard became the norm, maybe in the late 1940s?

Check and see if chord combinations that use the 7th and dims buttons, like the 7b9 on guides like https://accordionchords.com/category/7b9-chords/ work on your accordion?

I am not really a musician, so I can't say I understand this stuff, but my friend's older accordion didn't sound jazzy, and this was a good excuse.

(Thanks to lmschgo for mentioning that cool chord site.)
 

debra

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Further exploration has revealed that it is not a fifth in the bass section, rather a full 5 octaves when playing bass and counterbass, while the chord notes have three octaves. The piccolo is just subtle enough to pique curiosity without being annoying.
...
Interesting, but maybe you should check again...
Most accordions with just stradella bass have a setup with 5 reeds, but not doing full 5 octaves. To hide the octave jump they offset the octave jump somewhere in the middle. This is why on bass register markings you see one dot offset from the other four dots.
 

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Mr Mark

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Interesting, but maybe you should check again...
Most accordions with just stradella bass have a setup with 5 reeds, but not doing full 5 octaves. To hide the octave jump they offset the octave jump somewhere in the middle. This is why on bass register markings you see one dot offset from the other four dots.
Just to be sure I did check again, and this is what I observed;

1) G1-F#2 (49 mm reed)
2) G2-F#3 (44 mm reed)
3) G3-F#4 (28 mm reed)
4) G4-F#5 (24 mm reed)
5) G5-F#6 (16 mm reed)

There are no registers on the bass, when the bass and counterbass buttons are pressed, it activates all five reeds, when any chord button is pressed it activates reeds 3, 4 and 5 only.
 

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These old Hohners were definitely 5 octaves in the bass and 3 in the chords. I restored a similar vintage 1938/1939 Hohner Tango II (only single palm switch for MM/LMM) which also spanned G1 - F#6.

If you look at the early Hohners with bass registers, a lot of them actually stack all 5 dots. You can see this on the M-series Tango and Verdi. I haven't physically checked any of those, so maybe it was just a visual thing to indicate 5 sets of reeds. But if they meant what they showed then that suggests they were still stacking all 5 octaves at least in the 1950's.

I need to confirm, but I believe the same applies to my 1959 Morino VI M. The Stradella bass master has 4 stacked octaves (4 bass, 2 chord) and then the 5th octave, which applies to bass and chord, can be added with a slide register. However, it is a free bass instrument, so the range would have been required for non-Stradella reasons either way.
 

debra

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Just to be sure I did check again, and this is what I observed;

1) G1-F#2 (49 mm reed)
2) G2-F#3 (44 mm reed)
3) G3-F#4 (28 mm reed)
4) G4-F#5 (24 mm reed)
5) G5-F#6 (16 mm reed)

There are no registers on the bass, when the bass and counterbass buttons are pressed, it activates all five reeds, when any chord button is pressed it activates reeds 3, 4 and 5 only.
Thanks. Good to know. This would suggest that the octave jump should then always be very easy to hear... Maybe the offset reed bank was a later invention, to partially mimic the Shepard scale.
 

debra

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These old Hohners were definitely 5 octaves in the bass and 3 in the chords. I restored a similar vintage 1938/1939 Hohner Tango II (only single palm switch for MM/LMM) which also spanned G1 - F#6.

If you look at the early Hohners with bass registers, a lot of them actually stack all 5 dots. You can see this on the M-series Tango and Verdi. I haven't physically checked any of those, so maybe it was just a visual thing to indicate 5 sets of reeds. But if they meant what they showed then that suggests they were still stacking all 5 octaves at least in the 1950's.

I need to confirm, but I believe the same applies to my 1959 Morino VI M. The Stradella bass master has 4 stacked octaves (4 bass, 2 chord) and then the 5th octave, which applies to bass and chord, can be added with a slide register. However, it is a free bass instrument, so the range would have been required for non-Stradella reasons either way.
The old Morino, whether M or later N series, has free bass indeed, and this makes a good Stradella tone a bit harder to obtain than on an accordion without free bass. It requires more pallets to open and that makes the Stradella bass require more force to play (button press force, not bellows force). The Morino is also the only accordion I ever saw that has reeds going from E1 up to D#7, for 6 octaves in LM, or 60 notes, but only the lower 58 notes are available in free bass (stopping at C#, so the highest notes (D and D#) only play in the Stradella bass. Go figure...
 

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