• If you haven't done so already, please add a location to your profile. This helps when people are trying to assist you, suggest resources, etc. Thanks

I may have found the one.

Mr Mark

Squeezebagger Extraordinaire...
Joined
Oct 27, 2016
Messages
218
Reaction score
15
Location
Edmonton, AB
Wow thanks for the info, lots there! I did order a dedicated volume control that is meant for the element so that should be good. Going to have to digest some of this info as I am not electronic savvy. If I've learned anything about the tone control and my application it'll be all about turning down the lows, they are always overpowering my other single mic setups. Thanks!
 

Mr Mark

Squeezebagger Extraordinaire...
Joined
Oct 27, 2016
Messages
218
Reaction score
15
Location
Edmonton, AB
i have taken an innertube and cut pieces out to hold a GreenBullet element
so it is somewhat protected from vibration
(making an envelope for it with a big hole slightly smaller than the mic)

there are newer soft rubbery materials with less weight and density now

a 2.0 microfarad tantalum capacitor in the circuit from the positive leg
is a good protective coupler, but electrolytics are fine too

if you mount a dedicated volume control for the mic, 10,000 Ohms is enough,
i prefer click types as they hold their setting firmly (but are getting hard to find)
22,000 Ohms is fine too (audio taper of course) stay away from high resistance
potentiometers, as the more resistance in a passive audio circuit, often = the more noise

adding a tone control is easy if you want one... just drain a .0047 or so Microfarad Capacitor
through any old leftover potentiometer you have laying around to ground...
that trims off just the highest frequencies

if mounting without screws, the mounting tapes for Automotive Trim are much more
reliable and firm than normal white foam doublesided, and 3m actually has a
permanent type available to the market now (positioning is ok, but once
you pressure it into place, it never moves again)

currently, parts express has some surplus bulkhead phono plug passthroughs that
seem airtight (couple of dollars each)

AND you are making me ashamed of my laziness !

ciao

Ventura
The mic element arrived today - happy easter to me, I've got my work cut out!

If I was smart I would have gotten the rubber insulator included and made a simple bracket from tin to hold it all and been stellar, but I'm sure some ol rubber tube will work, or a reasonable facsimile thereof.

I think I'll settle for the volume control only, using a mixer eq for tone will give me more control. Did a lot of reading on that bit and one thing that did come up on guitar forums was the fact the .0047 sometimes added a touch of chorus...not sure if that is accurate or not but I wouldn't want that. I also found this, I assume it's you? https://groups.google.com/g/rec.music.makers.squeezebox/c/S530OzCZf5g . Wow, lots of info there, that's great!

I didn't realize these are actually originally designed for a 1/4" plug, I thought it would be XLR. No matter, the 1/4" is a lot smaller hole and wireless systems a lot cheaper and more available than xlr.

I hate to add holes to this box, but, need the mic so here goes.


Finally, I wish I was a better tuner. It's not so much tuning as it is setting the voicing that is hard. A couple of notes are a real struggle and I'm afraid I'm just going to have to live with it. Sometimes I pick up my Roland and wish it was that easy to sound that perfect. But it isn't!
 

Pipemajor

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2017
Messages
275
Reaction score
51
Location
London, Limousin, France
The mic element arrived today - happy easter to me, I've got my work cut out!

If I was smart I would have gotten the rubber insulator included and made a simple bracket from tin to hold it all and been stellar, but I'm sure some ol rubber tube will work, or a reasonable facsimile thereof.

I think I'll settle for the volume control only, using a mixer eq for tone will give me more control. Did a lot of reading on that bit and one thing that did come up on guitar forums was the fact the .0047 sometimes added a touch of chorus...not sure if that is accurate or not but I wouldn't want that. I also found this, I assume it's you? https://groups.google.com/g/rec.music.makers.squeezebox/c/S530OzCZf5g . Wow, lots of info there, that's great!

I didn't realize these are actually originally designed for a 1/4" plug, I thought it would be XLR. No matter, the 1/4" is a lot smaller hole and wireless systems a lot cheaper and more available than xlr.

I hate to add holes to this box, but, need the mic so here goes.


Finally, I wish I was a better tuner. It's not so much tuning as it is setting the voicing that is hard. A couple of notes are a real struggle and I'm afraid I'm just going to have to live with it. Sometimes I pick up my Roland and wish it was that easy to sound that perfect. But it isn't!
I too find voicing the most difficult. There seems to be no Rhyme or Reason to it. I've found 2 adjacent notes, given the same gap will sound totally different in terms of starting etc. and it seems to be a matter of trial and error to get it right.
 

Ventura

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
365
Reaction score
138
Location
mid-atlantic, USA
yes, the rec.music.makers.squeezebox (and many other old UseNet chatgroups) are
still maintained by Google, some only as a public service but some still active
to a degree

it is very kind of them to keep this resource available on their servers... by comparison,
Yahoo Groups is no longer really supported as a platform, and all the archival
knowledge has been deleted from their servers
 

oldbayan

Active member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
138
Reaction score
14
Location
Toronto, Canada
Great find. Best of luck with it.
However, In about 50 years of playing the accordion I have learned that there is no such thing as "the one" in terms of accordion. Every accordion has its strengths and weaknesses, and no accordion has everything you want. (In case anyone doubts this, an accordion that has all the features you want will not have the size and weight you want, and vice versa.)
I will even add: every accordion has tunes in it, and we need to find them!
 

debra

Been here for ages!
Technical Adviser
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 16, 2014
Messages
3,487
Reaction score
345
Location
Eindhoven, the Nnetherlannds
I too find voicing the most difficult. There seems to be no Rhyme or Reason to it. I've found 2 adjacent notes, given the same gap will sound totally different in terms of starting etc. and it seems to be a matter of trial and error to get it right.
If tuning and voicing were easy accordion repairers would have much less work and be poor. With high notes voicing is a bit of trial and error because everything is too small to actually see the differences in the gap between reed and reed plate. With somewhat larger reeds you can judge the voicing visually. It isn't just a matter of how far the reed tip sits above the reed plate, but also of how well centered it is (same gap left and right). And it's also not just about how well the reed starts (without choking) but also about the volume it produces. When adjacent notes have very different sound volume (at the same pressure) then they are not voiced the same. The higher the reed sits above the reed plate the louder the reed plays.
 

Pipemajor

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2017
Messages
275
Reaction score
51
Location
London, Limousin, France
If tuning and voicing were easy accordion repairers would have much less work and be poor. With high notes voicing is a bit of trial and error because everything is too small to actually see the differences in the gap between reed and reed plate. With somewhat larger reeds you can judge the voicing visually. It isn't just a matter of how far the reed tip sits above the reed plate, but also of how well centered it is (same gap left and right). And it's also not just about how well the reed starts (without choking) but also about the volume it produces. When adjacent notes have very different sound volume (at the same pressure) then they are not voiced the same. The higher the reed sits above the reed plate the louder the reed plays.
Thanks Paul. I have a few notes which seem quieter than their neighbours.
I'll try opening the gaps. 👍
 

debra

Been here for ages!
Technical Adviser
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 16, 2014
Messages
3,487
Reaction score
345
Location
Eindhoven, the Nnetherlannds
Thanks Paul. I have a few notes which seem quieter than their neighbours.
I'll try opening the gaps. 👍
"Seem" is not good enough. When you record the sound (without AGC or automatic gain control) and then look at the waveforms you know for sure whether one note is objectively louder or softer than a neighboring one.
 

Similar threads

Top