• If you haven't done so already, please add a location to your profile. This helps when people are trying to assist you, suggest resources, etc. Thanks

Comprehensive Method for the Chromatic Free Base System

JIM D.

Been here for ages!
Technical Adviser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 30, 2013
Messages
4,672
Reaction score
188
The information here is of the Bassetti Bass layout. The Free Bass system in use today is called Converter and converts a 120 bass Stradella bass to 3 octaves of single notes. Try this site, its free --- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-bass_system --- JIM D.
 

dunlustin

Prolific poster
Site Supporter
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
1,062
Reaction score
74
Location
S W England
Thanks for the Ellegaard info'
FWIW
My little Weltmeister has only Freebasses - 26 chromatic notes- in three rows.
Similar instruments are sold by several builders in Europe - usually described as suitable for 1st or 2nd stage Conservatoire (from about 5yrs)
They are usually of a much higher quality than mine - see Pigini for example.
As JIMD says, where the Stradella (from about 78 bass) is also present, they are called convertor (In French Declencheur).
To date the weirdest thing I've found is that the keyboard is (usually) a mirror of the R-hand Csystem cba. (Do not try using a R-hand chart to work out what's going on unless your brain is very different from mine.)
My fingers were used to having the highest note to the index finger and the change was very strange.
 

dunlustin

Prolific poster
Site Supporter
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
1,062
Reaction score
74
Location
S W England
PS
Just realised I had seen this before and looked at the pieces at the end - the Menuet was accessible but the other two way beyond me.
I'm not sure I'd call this a complete method?
The chromatic exercises are more or less running up the rows.
The chords/arpeggios are easily extracted from the layout but hard to do more than 3 fingers - just 2 sometimes (for now)
For all that it's an interesting resource.

Has anyone else found useful learning material for Freebass?
 

Anyanka

Prolific poster
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
1,455
Reaction score
8
Location
Reigate, Surrey, UK
Thank you, Pentaprism - looks interesting, but I can only see 3 pages and the third one consists of three different 'slices'...

oops, doorbell!
 
R

Russ

Guest
Bassetti or converter the button layout is the same on the three rows so any method for free bass is good for converter, plain freebass or bassetti.

1. Mogens Ellegaards book is excellent with good exercises and very structured. Good chromatic fingering theory.

2.The Borgstrom/Charles series start with with First Steps on the Bassetti the skill leap from this book to book one Progressive Method for Chromatic Free Bass Accordion Volume 1 is considerable. I have not ordered volume two yet. Books can be order from Mr Borgstrom http://www.borgmusic.ca/ or from Deffner Publications.

3. How to Play the Free Bassetti System Accordion by Flaviano Fogli and Frank Gaviani. Excellent but quite difficult technical exercises. Can be ordered from Deffner Publications: http://www.ernestdeffner.com

I recommend all the above.
 

JerryPH

Been here for ages!
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 16, 2016
Messages
2,970
Reaction score
55
Location
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
pentaprism post_id=5408 time=1374544201 user_id=107 said:
I just ran into this. You may find it useful (I do):
Ive known aout this book for 2 years now thanks to this board! :D

I first downloaded the PDF format that I found online, but recently received an original copy from Paul Ramunni from the NEAM as a gift. Is it complete? Of course not, no book less than thousands of pages could be considered complete. Is it a good place to start? No, it is an EXCELLENT place to start from.

I also highly recommend The Progresive Method for Chromatic Free Bass Accordion by BORG Music (I had the pleasure of meeting Boris Borg in person earlier this year!), and of course The Complete Technique Book for Piano Accordion by Joseph Macerollo (whom I also had the pleasure of meeting and was even his student many times during my conservatory days).

After you have gone through these two books, you can start using some piano exercise books. The LITTLE PICHNA series is an incredible book to use once you are intermediate level and above.
 

JerryPH

Been here for ages!
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 16, 2016
Messages
2,970
Reaction score
55
Location
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
dunlustin post_id=5418 time=1374571865 user_id=70 said:
My little Weltmeister has only Freebasses - 26 chromatic notes- in three rows.
Similar instruments are sold by several builders in Europe - usually described as suitable for 1st or 2nd stage Conservatoire (from about 5yrs)
My fingers were used to having the highest note to the index finger and the change was very strange.
You had the Russian Bayan system for Free Bass. The older versions all had the deep notes up top, high notes down lower to your knees (while playing the accordion, of course).

I have one from the NEAM, a tiny little thing, but I love it!

My little Hohner is likely from the 1950s (waterfall keys), but really is in like new condition:
www.accordionmemories.com/baby

You can see it in action in the Silent Night thread, where I play Silent Night on the Free Bass... lol
 
Top