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Booster springs....

losthobos

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I'm going to add a couple of booster springs over a couple of sloppy leather valves....done before and easy peasy....
But just wondering "do the inside leathers also have springs fitted"... as this is obviously not so easy peasy...
Many thanks
 
Yes you should add the boosters to both sides. Inside you can do with sone tweezers and takes time snd patience. Sometimes you just have to remove the reed and do it, then rewax.
 
It'll be easier to take the inside leather out, attach the booster, and glue it back in. It can be done with tweezers and a bright light. I would only do the inside ones as necessary. Of course, adding boosters will likely lower the pitch of the opposite reed, so some tuning may be needed after.
 
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Thank you for replies...
Am I right to assume the heavier the booster spring the more the pitch may drop...??
Or is it possible to add anything like hairspray? to curl the flappers back flat and avoid tuning issues..
 
Last edited:
Thank you for replies...
Am I right to assume the heavier the booster spring the more the pitch may drop...??
Or is it possible to add anything like hairspray? to curl the flappers back flat and avoid tuning issues..
I've never tried hairspray. Basically, anything that causes the leather to open less fully than when it was last tuned will cause the pitch to drop a few cents. However, since the leather is already opening more than when it was last tuned, it's likely already out of tune, and maybe this will fix it. I would just use the thinnest booster necessary. Leathers effect tuning, but it's basically impossible to adjust this with any degree of accuracy, which is why we file the reeds. It's only one of many factors that effect pitch, but it's most controllable one.
 
Last edited:
Thank you for replies...
Am I right to assume the heavier the booster spring the more the pitch may drop...??
Or is it possible to add anything like hairspray? to curl the flappers back flat and avoid tuning issues..
That is certainly true: When the valve offers more resistance the pitch will drop. Also, if the resistance varies with sound volume then the pitch will not be the same when you play softly versus loudly...
It is best to use the lightest spring that will keep the valve closed.
The most difficult part about tuning is the combination of tuning the reed and adjusting the valve and booster so that you get a consistent pitch, from pianissimo to fortissimo. Many accordion come back from a professional tuner with the notes only sounding "right" in mezzoforte, but not in piano or fortissimo.
 
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