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Beltuna Matrix?

Alan Sharkis

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I posted a similar question in the Accordion Chat board. Beltuna posted a “coming soon” video on their Facebook page. Beltuna also listed it as a product line on their website with no pictures, descriptions, etc. So please, if you have any info, solid or rumor, please let me know. I’m very curious, given that Beltuna likes to innovate.
 

Walker

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I doubt anyone outwith the factory gates will know the exact accordion secrets that lie within Beltuna's laboratories.

However, the eagle eyed will notice words in the video saying: the lightest free bass acoustic accordion with endless possibilities.

We can also glean in the video that Beltuna are creating an accordion in button and piano versions with some carbon fibre elements and a contemporary grill design. To what extent is the instrument constructed of carbon fibre? Only time will tell.

From the pattern of dimple marks in the bass buttons of the piano accordion it appears to be a quint converter. Naturally there will be a number of other chromatic systems available too.

The big question, is this going to be another solenoid bass system or a traditional mechanical bass? I hope it is the traditional system. I am not a fan of battery powered accordions.
For now @Alan Sharkis we shall have to wait and with a bit of luck @danp76 might buy one and we can all get our vicarious dose of accordion therapy from reading all about the endless possibilities of MATRIX.

 
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Alan Sharkis

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To add to my curiosity consider this: not only did Beltuna post the video on their Facebook page, but it was shared by Joe Natoli on the GR8 IDEAS page, which is devoted to digital and electronic accordions.

Thanks for your quick reply.

Alan Sharkis
 

debra

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The message "lightest free bass..." suggests that this accordion uses the solenoid-driven bass pallets (instead of the normal mechanically complex convertor mechanism). They don't say it, but it is their latest technological innovation so it would be a surprise if they didn't use it...
 

Ventura

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while i personally would not go for a solenoid bass system any
more than i would a stepper motorized bellows

nevertheless, logic could control a solenoid system the same as a MIDI
system, and thereby give an endless variety of (software switchable) bass
systems in one accordion, saving some musicians a lot of money over the long run
(similar to the selectable Roland Bass schemes)

carbon fibre does not particularly excite me either, as it solves problems
that largely did not exist anyway in my opinion.. while it may be nice and may be
an improvement in some areas, there are 70 to 100 year old accordions out there
that have lasted quite nicely without carbon fibre thank you very much

How do different materials reflect the sound ? that is really the variation from
Maple to Aluminum to Copper to Walnut to Oak.. none of the materials that
make up the strength of the Accordion resonate as they are locked down, therefore
it is in the reflection of sound waves that they can have an affect... not just tonally
but the various angles too..
(inside the reedblock chamber.. is it squared or rounded slightly ?
are sharp angles better or are curves better ? is the wood frequency reflection
improved with varnish or is it better with a simple Oiled finish ? )

how does the angle diffuse and remix the competing waveforms ?

what other ways can we bring forced or shaped mixture to bear ?

high frequencies are extremely directional, low ones can be re-inforced
by certain angles, can the wave mix that reaches your ears be sifted
in a way that equalizes and smoothes out the overall tone and volume ?

oh, and by the way, how may of you can still even hear above 8000 Htz ?

again, Gola was a master of equalizing tricks with his reedblocks and reeds...

i would prefer to see them spend time re-discovering those lost secrets
rather than carbon fibre grillework

the difference between Spruce Soundboards and Mahogany or Rosewood
is so vast it isn't even funny.. you can make a nice soundboard from Plywood too
but it just cannot even begin to compare to a quality Spruce soundboard

Maple is prized in instrument making for it's incredible strength and stability..
not for it's tone.. though it may make a nice hollow log drum, the cross plied
maple pinblock is what made Steinways higher tension cross-strung Piano Harp system
actually possible.. and things like bridges that cleanly transmit the energy in vibrating strings
TO a resonant soundboard also benefit from density and physical stability and strength

i DO agree that the total sum of an instrument shapes the sound it produces..
but do walnut keys, their unique grain pattern, primarily affect the linear stability
of your keyboard or did they use the Walnut as a sales gimmick, or does the
sound escaping under the keys magically get changed somehow due to the nice dark wood?
 

debra

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I totally agree @Ventura. Lets try to build better sounding accordions. Recover the old secrets of sound and maybe, just maybe, find a few of our own.
I would very much like someone to come up with a reed construction that supports a non-destructive tuning method. That would be truly innovative! Maybe something can be learnt from the way a Fender piano is tuned...
 

Ffingers

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"...oh, and by the way, how may of you can still even hear above 8000 Htz ?"

...or even over 2,000Hz after their 60th birthday.
 

debra

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"...oh, and by the way, how may of you can still even hear above 8000 Htz ?"

...or even over 2,000Hz after their 60th birthday.
I have not had a check recently, but I can still hear it when the C#8 (the highest reed that is made) is out of tune, and for a tuning app to measure that note the sample frequency needs to be set at 48.000 Hz. (The app cannot hear the note when the sample frequency is 44.100Hz.)
However... many people cannot hear that when you play in the MH register on a bayan it switches to MM when you go above the highest note for which a reed still exists.
Everyone I know can still hear whether the piccolo notes up to and including C#8 are still playing or are blocked (by a dust particle). And that requires hearing up to around 4.500 Hz at least. Many of these people I know are well over 60...
 

debra

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"Many of these people I know are well over 60..."

A-a-h-h! One of the advantages of leading a quiet life :D
Oh I wish... Many of these people have accordions in need of repair and/or tuning... I'm still at about twice the number of repairs per year of what I was hoping for when I retired from my "normal" job...
 

Ventura

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I would very much like someone to come up with a reed construction that supports a non-destructive tuning method. That would be truly innovative! Maybe something can be learnt from the way a Fender piano is tuned...
that would be an amazing improvement on so many levels

if i recall correctly, the Fender Tines have coils near the tip, and you move them
slightly inward or outward to change the pitch ? or is that the Wurlitzer

long long time since i was inside one of those beasts
 

debra

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that would be an amazing improvement on so many levels

if i recall correctly, the Fender Tines have coils near the tip, and you move them
slightly inward or outward to change the pitch ? or is that the Wurlitzer

long long time since i was inside one of those beasts
I only have the word of a piano tuner for this. Apparently there are two things you can do: you can adjust the vibrating "thing" (not a reed) to adjust the pitch, and you can adjust the coil position to change the timbre of the note. I have never looked inside these beasts myself.
 

Neil Thornock

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I only have the word of a piano tuner for this. Apparently there are two things you can do: you can adjust the vibrating "thing" (not a reed) to adjust the pitch, and you can adjust the coil position to change the timbre of the note. I have never looked inside these beasts myself.
I’m not quite visualizing this, but it brings to mind the tuning mechanism of a regal, with an adjustable tuning rod that slides across the reed. That would be so many extra parts though!
 

Alan Sharkis

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Beltuna has been an innovator in the past few years. First, using carbon fiber for body parts, and then, the solenoid-actuated pallets in the bass with a rechargeable battery to power them. I can’t help but wonder what’s next.
 
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