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Wireless comparison #2

Keymn

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I found this interesting comparison. My opinion, When comparing to wired, do you notice the wire is more low frequency? Except the Smooth Hound (never heard of brand) tested pretty much the same. What is your opinion?

 

Ventura

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it is not the wire that causes an audible difference

it is the PreAmp circuit you plug the wire into that has
a "personality" if the circuit is poorly designed or
realy cheap OpAmps were used

a wire would have to be incredibly cheaply made and very very
very long before it will act in any way to affect tone

in all analog wireless devices, the transmitter pre-amp is the
weakest link for tone, Digital wireless is dependant on the
DAC (Digital Analog Convertor) which is pretty robust and
techologically mature at this point

ALL mixing and audio path devices are SUPPOSED to be designed and
engineered to be 100% TRANSPARENT regarding the sound they are
passing through/amplifying

i recommend Musicians reject ANY audio device that acts in any way as a
Tone Control, with the exception of Effects Processors you select and wish to use,
and equaliser circuits/tone controls built into mixers

after paying many thousands of dollars for an amazing accordion with reeds that
sometimes even have their own NAME, to allow some audio device to change
the tone it produces is unacceptable

ciao

Ventura
 

jozz

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that cable loses so much frequency he might want to replace that

this reviewer needs to put that cable between the wireless base output and recording input

then we know what's what
 

JerryPH

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IMHO, the changes were not from the cable but from the electrical characteristics applied to the sound that each unit gives, and on top of that none of them were different enough that minor EQ adjustments could have addressed to make them all sound identical to our ears. In this case, price, reliability, resistance to drops and range would determine the winner for me.
 

jozz

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Now that I have the Roland I can generate and repeat a constant accordion signal.

So I did a rudimentary test with my own stuff:
  1. FR-1x into "expensive" stageClix wireless into included Cordial CIK 122 w. Neutrik jacks into preamp.
  2. FR-1x directly into "average" Musictech cable into preamp.
  3. FR-1x directly into "cheap" Fender 'Original' cable into preamp.
I set the bellows curve to '3' so that the accordion plays without bellows, and played C4.

Then I took snapshots of a spectrum-o-meter graph.

The stageClix has 0.4dB more gain than both cables. I compensated for that, but that is negligable for humans.

The peaks are almost impossible to distinguish each time. I certainly cannot hear the difference. In the higher frequencies lie the most differences in the graphs.

Maybe if I used a really trashy garbage bin cable one would notice. Of course accordion is a totally different sound from guitar. I will work this out in a different post decently.
 

Ventura

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the physical parameters that affect audio cable performance are the type/thickness
of the core (whether stranded for flexibility or solid core, it is after all like a pipe,
so if the core is too thin it can be harder for electricity to flow (so to speak)

then the thickness of the insulation between the core and the shield wire
(this actually is how you create a capacitor, but since an audio cable is
not wound like a guitar pickup, the capacitance is negligible)

they type of shield also makes a difference... the famous BELDEN cable
made for Musical use and our standard for decades, with it's crisscrossed interlaced
incredibly strong yet flexible while providing near 99% shielding !
modern shield tech in wiring now includes a thin layer of plastic embedded with
carbon and such which gives it enough "wirelike" properties to be able to act as
a shield and drain to ground (the actual copper shield wire still coiled around it)

and finally the connection to the Jack, or the Jack itself... consider the standard
1/4 " jack, it has a rounded shaft and tip, they typically touch a flat contact
point meaning only a tiny part of the metal is actually making contact
and can turn if you tug on the cable while performing
(this is why XLR was preferred by many of us onstage... the contact is a sleeve sort
of flexible surround that makes firm contact on multiple points) and so
we rewired all Amps to use XLR for speaker cabling (this was before Speakon)

also some Jacks have terrible internal contact point and path engineering...
and this is why we relied upon Switchcraft products for many many decades

ciao

Ventura
 

Keymn

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With the line 6 g10s it has a switch to replicate 20 foot and 30 foot cables...high frequency roll off in the longer wire. see 1 minute into the video:

 

Ventura

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actully i own 2 of these G-30's... the reciever can be run on batteries easily
and i have them velcro'd on to a pair of Roland Street Cubes
(battery powered amps) i have a third battey powered amp set up
for voice (an old Bell and Howell WW2 speaker from a MASH projector
with a 12" co-ax Wolverine speaker and another Cube AMp guts now
built in...) total battery powered but good sounding solutions that allow
nice gigs under tents in Vineyards and such

the transmitters have a weakness in the battery compartment, but adding a
strip of foil across the top when you close the lid solves that issue

as you would imagine, i ignore the 20 / 30 settings, and assume it
is nothing more than typical Guitar Player marketing hype
(metal heads... they will believe almost anything... the electric
guitar market has long been enslaved to the idea of tone control
by device... from the Birch Speaker Cabinets to the Tube Pre-Amps)

again, as a keyboardist, transparency in the entire Audio Chain is paramount

ciao

Ventura
 

Keymn

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actully i own 2 of these G-30's... the reciever can be run on batteries easily
and i have them velcro'd on to a pair of Roland Street Cubes
(battery powered amps) i have a third battey powered amp set up
for voice (an old Bell and Howell WW2 speaker from a MASH projector
with a 12" co-ax Wolverine speaker and another Cube AMp guts now
built in...) total battery powered but good sounding solutions that allow
nice gigs under tents in Vineyards and such

the transmitters have a weakness in the battery compartment, but adding a
strip of foil across the top when you close the lid solves that issue

as you would imagine, i ignore the 20 / 30 settings, and assume it
is nothing more than typical Guitar Player marketing hype
(metal heads... they will believe almost anything... the electric
guitar market has long been enslaved to the idea of tone control
by device... from the Birch Speaker Cabinets to the Tube Pre-Amps)

again, as a keyboardist, transparency in the entire Audio Chain is paramount

ciao

Ventura
If you get past the transmitter battery compartment in the g30, think you have a nice system...
 

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