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Why the variation in keyboard size?

96Bass

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I’ve been looking at Beltuna Prestige IV 37/96 piano accordions.
The ones I have found show slight variations in keyboard length, 43, 44.5, and 45cm.
Is this intentional or manufacturing variations?
In American measurements they show as 17, 17.5, and 17.75 inches.
 

Scuromondo

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My understanding is that a “standard” keyboard length for a 41-key accordion is typically 19-19.5”, which would correspond approximately to the 17.5-17.75” keyboard length for a 37-key accordion.

The 17” model (which would be analogous to 18.5” in a 41-key accordion) would intentionally be designed that way with slightly narrower keys—mostly to reduce the overall size and weight of the instrument, but also to appeal to some players who either prefer that spacing or have smaller hands.
 

Valski

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My understanding is that a “standard” keyboard length for a 41-key accordion is typically 19-19.5”, which would correspond approximately to the 17.5-17.75” keyboard length for a 37-key accordion.

The 17” model (which would be analogous to 18.5” in a 41-key accordion) would intentionally be designed that way with slightly narrower keys—mostly to reduce the overall size and weight of the instrument, but also to appeal to some players who either prefer that spacing or have smaller hands.
There are also 41/120 piano accordions with 17 inch keboards that were called stroller or ladies models. This gives you the full range of keys while being lighter and easier to play with small hands. When I was young I had just this type and I traded it in for a full size model and got a good price because there was a high demand. I haven't seen newer versions of these (not that I'm in the market for one) but they were available years ago.
 

Scuromondo

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My brother still has the little Baldoni accordion that was his first accordion at age 6. It had a 15” keyboard. I tried playing it a couple years ago; it was a real challenge and very difficult to get used to. I was frequently (unintentionally) striking two adjacent keys at a time
 

olivigus

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I think my original accordion must be a ladies' model (it's 17.5 from key to key). It works well for me now that I'm used to the key spacing (much closer than the piano). Plus it's nice to be able to easily span more than an octave. One reason I got the second accordion I did (aside from wanting another middle reed) was that it had the same exact keyboard size as my first, so switching between them is easy.
 

96Bass

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I’m puzzled why they would make the same model with two keyboard sizes with a difference of just .5 centimeters.
 

jozz

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I would say unintentional variation

but not enough to scrap the treble side?
 

oldbayan

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Possibly made in different factories? Sometimes makers sub-contract the fabrication of instruments and parts.
 
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I translate keyboard variation to key width. I like to play a 3/4" key - which is more of a ladies size, but it has to do with just how wide your fingers are. I gauge on the thumb size, It should just fit a key. In my case a 3/4" translate to 18.5" white to white. If you have bigger fingers use wider keys.

Doug
 

AccordionUprising

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In a recent interview "Weird Al" Yankovic said he looked for narrower keyboard accordions because they were easier to play when he's moving around on stage. He wasn't buying them new, so no idea if anybody's making them now.
 

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