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Why is this notation reversed

Happy girl

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I am currently working on a 1930’s book entitled Fifty More Old Favourites for the Piano Accordion.

Can anyone please explain why the b flat is reversed in such a way & how it is to be played?

The piece in question is La Traviata- Verdy.

Thank you.
 

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debra

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As this book is for the piano the chords are reversed as the arranger wants, to have the chords sounds similarly low or high. If the Bm chord were not reversed the F# would sound too high. On an accordion it's up to the accordion manufacturer to decide which notes to place on which chord to again achieve chords that all sound "roughly equally high".
 

Happy girl

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Thank you for your answer Glen, but unfortunately I don't understand the explanation at all. I am not referring to cord inversions.

My query is specifically asking why would B flat be printed on the stave & directly underneath it is a B natural sign, & in the next bar a B natural on the stave & directly underneath states it is a B flat.

Also, If this book states the content is notation is for the piano accordion, where does the suggestion come from that it is a book for the piano?
 

losthobos

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Don't worry about ancient typos wether they be right or wrong.. Let your ears decide..... Trust in yourself... Best wishes
 

Tom

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I'm with Lost, probably a typo...
 

Glenn

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Looks like the typesetter has reversed the symbols. Must have been a late Friday afternoon job. I see a few splashes of Typex have already been used on this manuscript so a couple more won’t look out of place.
 

Brian K W Lightowler

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Agree with Glen ...a typo... a slip of the typesetter easily done...(with respect like Happy girl's unconventional spelling of Verdi....presumably from predictive text). Also I think the B in the 2nd bar shown would sound better harmonised with an E in the chord rather than E# - making that chord E maj.
 

debra

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My experience with typos is that generally professionals appear to have more faith in what a composer or a publisher's typesetter has written than in their common sense, knowledge of harmony, and ears and brain. Amateurs seem to more easily question whether what has been written can actually be correct or is more likely wrong...
A good example is "Rondo Capricciosa" by Solotarjov (however you spell that name). The printed score (and the arrangement for accordion orchestra by Helmut Quakernack) has what is clearly an error in the bass part, even clearer when you hear the correct and the wrong version side by side. All professionals always play that wrong bass. All accordion orchestras (except the one using my correction) always play that wrong bass. It's sad: nobody but me dares to question the score...
 
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