• If you haven't done so already, please add a location to your profile. This helps when people are trying to assist you, suggest resources, etc. Thanks

Which way up should the accordion be when storing in case?

Jules

Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 24, 2022
Messages
35
Reaction score
25
Location
NW Florida
Hello! I have a Guerrini Ramona IV 72 bass piano accordion that I keep in a soft Fuselli Gigi Bag that looks like the attached photo. I've found conflicting information regarding the best position to store an accordion while it's in its case, so I'm a little confused. Some say to store it with the keyboard facing upward and parallel to the floor, and this case is oriented to stand that way, but I've also seen lots of folks saying to store it in the playing position with the keyboard perpendicular to the floor. I want to make sure I position it correctly when not in use so as to avoid gravity induced damage to any internal parts.

So which way up should I position it when I'm not playing it? Or does it only matter if you don't play it for long periods of time?

Thanks so much!
 

Attachments

  • Accordion Case.PNG
    Accordion Case.PNG
    377.2 KB · Views: 2

Scuromondo

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 16, 2020
Messages
309
Reaction score
178
Location
Washington, DC, USA
If it does not have a cassotto, then storing it on its feet (with the keyboard perpendicular to the floor) is best, but storing it in the playing position is also ok. If it has a cassotto then the only way is in the playing position.
 

Jules

Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 24, 2022
Messages
35
Reaction score
25
Location
NW Florida
If it does not have a cassotto, then storing it on its feet (with the keyboard perpendicular to the floor) is best, but storing it in the playing position is also ok. If it has a cassotto then the only way is in the playing position.
Thank you so much for the reply! I've seen conflicting information everywhere I've looked online (even in posts in this forum), so I've been nervous about it. I don't see anything about cassotto in the listing from when I bought it, so I'm assuming it does *not* have it then. So it should be stored in its case in the position shown in the photo below?
 

Attachments

  • accordion2.jpg
    accordion2.jpg
    108.8 KB · Views: 9
  • Accordion.jpg
    Accordion.jpg
    40.8 KB · Views: 9

debra

Been here for ages!
Technical Adviser
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 16, 2014
Messages
4,403
Reaction score
1,577
Location
Eindhoven, the Nnetherlannds
Besides cassotto an accordion should also be stored in the playing position when it has a "Winkelbaß", which means a bass reed block where the largest reeds are mounted at a 90 degree angle. Whether an accordion has this or not is very rarely listed in the description of a model.
When in doubt, always store an accordion in the playing position because that is fine for all accordions.
If you see accordions in a showroom they will always be displayed standing on their feet. Don't take this as a recommendation for how to store the accordion. It doesn't hurt the accordion when it is put on display and sold relatively quickly, but it should not be stored like this for a long time (if it has cassotto or Winkelbaß).
 

Jules

Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 24, 2022
Messages
35
Reaction score
25
Location
NW Florida
Besides cassotto an accordion should also be stored in the playing position when it has a "Winkelbaß", which means a bass reed block where the largest reeds are mounted at a 90 degree angle. Whether an accordion has this or not is very rarely listed in the description of a model.
When in doubt, always store an accordion in the playing position because that is fine for all accordions.
If you see accordions in a showroom they will always be displayed standing on their feet. Don't take this as a recommendation for how to store the accordion. It doesn't hurt the accordion when it is put on display and sold relatively quickly, but it should not be stored like this for a long time (if it has cassotto or Winkelbaß).
Thank you! Well, if it's always safe to store an accordion in the playing position, then that's what I'll do. I really appreciate the information! I had never heard of cassotto or Winkelbaß before!
 

Dingo40

Been here for ages!
Joined
Nov 27, 2017
Messages
2,987
Reaction score
1,769
Location
South Australia
Jules,
Here's a link to a very comprehensive earlier thread on this subject:
Personally, all my accordions had already been stored "incorrectly" for decades before the matter became a topic of interest that I doubt any change now would make much of a difference for them.🙂
 
Last edited:

debra

Been here for ages!
Technical Adviser
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 16, 2014
Messages
4,403
Reaction score
1,577
Location
Eindhoven, the Nnetherlannds
...
Personally, all my accordions had already been stored "incorrectly" for decades before the matter became a topic of interest that I doubt any change now would make much of a difference for them.🙂
It's a gradual process of deterioration due to gravity (but only for valves being pulled open by gravity when the accordion is on its feet). What you notice most is that the lowest octave in the L register becomes slow to start on pull (and not on push). When that happens the valves need to be replaced or readjusted. It is mostly a problem when the valves do not have metal booster springs. The problem may take about 10 years to become noticeable, and by 20 years it's impossible to miss. It keeps getting worse, and that causes the problem that because the change is so gradual the player gets so used to the "current" situation with the accordion that (s)he never realizes that it has gotten worse over the years.
 

Jules

Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 24, 2022
Messages
35
Reaction score
25
Location
NW Florida
Jules,
Here's a link to a very comprehensive earlier thread on this subject:
Personally, all my accordions had already been stored "incorrectly" for decades before the matter became a topic of interest that I doubt any change now would make much of a difference for them.🙂
Thank you!
 

Jules

Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 24, 2022
Messages
35
Reaction score
25
Location
NW Florida
It's a gradual process of deterioration due to gravity (but only for valves being pulled open by gravity when the accordion is on its feet). What you notice most is that the lowest octave in the L register becomes slow to start on pull (and not on push). When that happens the valves need to be replaced or readjusted. It is mostly a problem when the valves do not have metal booster springs. The problem may take about 10 years to become noticeable, and by 20 years it's impossible to miss. It keeps getting worse, and that causes the problem that because the change is so gradual the player gets so used to the "current" situation with the accordion that (s)he never realizes that it has gotten worse over the years.
Thank you for that explanation. It really helps to know how, when and and why it happens!
 

Skari

Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 8, 2022
Messages
54
Reaction score
57
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Here is an example of reed-valve sag on an old Hohner Morino Club I recently acquired on eBay.de. It must have been stored on its feet for much of its life, as the down-facing valves on the cassotto reed blocks have really curled.

I wish that was the only thing that needs attention on this old guy. I am planning to do some restoration work using techniques learned from this forum and other online sources. Fortunately, I didn't pay much for the accordion, so I can take some risks. I must be one of the few that still plays the club layout.

27CF0899-BC54-49B0-892C-640742163DBC.jpeg2FB0C80F-CB3B-43DA-BF66-C743621243DA.jpeg
 

debra

Been here for ages!
Technical Adviser
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 16, 2014
Messages
4,403
Reaction score
1,577
Location
Eindhoven, the Nnetherlannds
Here is an example of reed-valve sag on an old Hohner Morino Club I recently acquired on eBay.de. ....
Many thanks for these pictures. A very clear illustration of the problem. I keep telling people to store their accordion in the playing orientation and they look at me in disbelief because 1) their teacher never told them and 2) the person or store they bought the accordion from didn't tell them and 3) accordions are on display in accordion stores, all sitting on their feet instead of in the playing orientation...
 

Skari

Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 8, 2022
Messages
54
Reaction score
57
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Here is another view of the cassotto reed block. The up side is on the left, down on the right. I will be storing my cassotto accordions in playing position from now on.

DE2EDBE9-664B-4321-8FD6-0F9D60C6D738.jpeg
 

HiTechBiniou

Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2019
Messages
27
Reaction score
14
Location
Quebec
The main solution is to keep your accordion standing up in the playing position because that way, ALL LEATHERS (VALVES) WILL BE ON THEIR SIDE.

Try to hold a 8"X11" sheet of paper horizontally and you will notice it will always fall down. Hold it on its side, it will stay like that more easily.

The attached picture show a regular non cassotto accordion and still, you can see in the bass region that one reedblock is not completely vertical.

The leathers on this side will warp if you keep your accordion on its feets.
 

Attachments

  • Diapositive130.JPG
    Diapositive130.JPG
    101.5 KB · Views: 4

Similar threads

Top