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What a blast!

Jbalou02

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I was at my buddies house last night and after a rock jam session he pulled out a chromatic accordion, what a blast! We all tried it and laughed and laughed. I was hooked! Result...I picked up this old Conn 80 button today! It has "Made in Germany" imprinted on the back and "D.R.P" stamped inside of the bass apparatus box. Anyone have a guess on it's age and/or origin? My research found nothing about Conn coming from Germany, I imagine it was made by someone else for them? Its not great by a fair stretch, all the leather straps were blown out so I cobbled some temporary stuff (used old hardware and mounting holes) so I could try it out, seem pretty useable! All the keys work, middle c bass key is pretty banged on but really it sounds great! Even has most of it's rhinestones. I'm not sure this is the best rig to learn on, but I do think I'll keep it. If anyone has a idea or any info on age or value I'd appreciate your input! Thanks for stopping in, I'm looking forward to poking around here more as I advance my Accordionist career!
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Dingo40

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To my amateur eye, it appears to be a pre-ww2 model, not that there's anything wrong with that that a good technician couldn't fix🙂
Should have a very nice tone.
It will certainly be distinctive!🙂
Always interesting.
This one is "chromatic ", but there's also a a chromatic variety with buttons on both sides instead of keys on the treble side.
Happy learning !
 
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Jbalou02

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Thanks for your reply Dingo40, already more learning! I though it was as simple as the ones with piano keys were considered "piano" and buttons on both sides 'chromatic" accordions. I did find one with similar grille that is a thought to be a German Meinel & Herold , but the wiki says Conn bought the Italian accordion maker Soprani in 1929.

antique-piano-accordion-068b.jpg

The bellows on mine seems quite unruly compared to that newer instrument I played. Would I be better off starting on something smaller or just in better condition? I've only got $40 into this thing. Thanks again for your input, CHeers! :D
 

Anyanka

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Accordion terminology can be quite confusing - especially as American and British usage is not the same! The opposite of the chromatic accordion is the diatonic accordion (known as a melodeon in this country), which usually has buttons on both sides.... hence the term Chromatic Button Accordion to identify the beasts I play which are exactly the same as a piano accordion on the inside and have all the notes. Piano accordions are always chromatic, as far as I know. Unless you get one where the black keys have been painted on like on a children's toy piano...

Unruly bellows will hold you back; size is not the most important consideration but ease of playing should be. My first proper accordion was a 1970s East German thing, which actually gave me 'tennis' elbow because the bellows required so much pull! If possible, find an accordion shop and try before you buy.
 
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