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Unusual combination πŸ™‚

Chickers

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I think it's a beautiful rendition, and shows very talented musicians, but I feel the video portion is very distracting;
too much "look at me effect".
 

donn

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Like practically every pro accordion video. For me, if you don't have the whole ensemble, actually playing the notes I'm hearing on audio recorded along with the video, then show me a nice picture of a tree or a mountain stream or something.

I can tolerate a little suspension of disbelief, though. E.g., Marta Pereira da Costa - Terra
 

Sean

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When watching musicians perform, my preference is for a more traditional view -- the more closeups on the keyboard, the better! lol. Even watching recorded video performances, I'd prefer to feel like I'm sitting in the front row at Carnegie Hall.

But I imagine even incredibly talented musicians like these two need to drum up views (and money) on YouTube. Unlike websites dedicated to musicians or learning instruments etc, they're competing for eyeballs with lots of glitzy videos on YouTube. I appeciate how they're bringing their music to wider audiences. If that takes some occasionally over-the-top cinematography, more power to them. I can just close my eyes and listen..

BTW, I noticed these musicians published this video on YouTube in April 2016. According to Google Trends, the term 'drone footage' was ascending globally at that point, its popularity peaking out in 2017. It's always interesting to see how new technology interacts with musical performance. They took their bandura and accordion and rode the wave! :):LOL:

Thanks again for sharing, Dingo!

drone.jpg
 

JerryPH

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Technology is great and some like it while others don't. I think we need to understand what the goal was. Traditional videos are there to show the musician, to display a piece, to show off talent. This last trend lately for cinematic effects has come because of drones, higher end high resolution cameras, powerful computers and editing software that can not just edit the audio and video footage but literally create sci-fi levels of special effects.

So... where is the line? At what point does a video move from a display of talent to a visual story to cinematic experience to "this is simply too much"?

For me a lot depends on how it is assembled in post production. Movement and motion is good, but I don't like so much motion that I get vertigo watching it and the moment the video distracts from the music, it becomes a bit of a fail.

... but thats me. :)
 

donn

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For me, the two fundamentally different goals are
  • capture and present an actual music performance event
  • assemble and present an engineered music recording with accompanying video
In the second case, put what you want in there - wild video montages, pictures of butterflies, whatever. What I've never much cared for, is when the second pretends to be the first. Nothing about that is good. The transparent pretense itself offends. The apparently rigid discipline that allows them to make the performance poses with some confidence that they will be synchronous with the engineered recording. The instruments - strings, bass, etc. - that one hears from invisible players as if from the heavens. I thought the concept was exposed to enough ridicule when it was used in '60s TV that it would have withered away. To the extent this works, it works in spite of itself, the music prevailing over the deceit. The real thing can be so much more powerful. Imagine someone trying to pull that stunt with music of real depth. Early Fritz Kreisler rendition of Meditation from ThaΓ―s.
 

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