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Two Doors Down... BBC comedy..

Soulsaver

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On funny theme, accordions have been featured in BBC series Two Doors Down a couple of times... http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04jbrst

Last night featured a Strip The Willow by John Burns (credits, not appearance) - and a nice looking Alvari accordion, although I think looked like with bass problems, but may have been the actor pressing a handful of bass buttons....
See it on iPlayer, 21 minutes in. (Outside UK may not be able to access it, licencing issue) http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b085t29k/two-doors-down-series-2-episode-4
Warning - contains language that some may find offensive..
 
M

maugein96

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Hi Soulsaver,

My wife was watching the programme and drew my attention to the accordion being played. Unfortunately I never paid any attention to the accordion, which I thought would be just a stage prop. The language is a bit colourful as you say, although I was brought up in the Scottish "Black Country" in North Lanarkshire to the east of Glasgow, and it is fairly typical of how ordinary people speak to each other. We were regarded as country bumpkins by the Glasgow people but our accent was similar to theirs, and so was the humour. Our dialect was a bit more influenced by the fact that most of us were actually descended from people who came to Scotland from Ulster, both Protestant and Catholic. We all got on OK until Rangers were playing Celtic and then the fighting started. Even although I've not lived there for many years I still tend to curse and swear much in the manner of the programme characters.

The first link works OK. I was pleasantly surprised to hear Doon Mackichan playing a waltz on a glitzy Fisitalia PA, rather than the tracks played on the programme. Don't know why she is in the series as her "Home Counties" English accent is quite noticeable, even when she is trying to be very Scottish sounding. She is a great actress and character nevertheless, and I suppose it is only a TV programme. Apparently the waltz is her own composition.

Second link comes up with the "404" Error, and I am in the UK. Don't know what happened there.

Thanks for the post Soulsaver.
 

artelagro

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This forum never fails to amaze me. How could Soulsaver, from way down south in the north west, find a programme targeted at Weegies ( persons emanating from Glasgow). I lived for almost sixty years in a council scheme in the East end of Glasgow and can relate to 99% of the programme content but didn't think it would find a remote audience who could understand either the spoken or the physical language of the locals. Maugein's understanding of the weegie's view of outsiders is spot on - As long as you didn't come from Edinburgh.
Going back to the accordion content- short and sweet but glad you found it SS.
Ca canny
Garth
 

Soulsaver

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:tup: Thanks Anyanka - could swear I tried it & it worked for me... but as I keep saying - there is an age one gets to and maybe I dreamed it.

:tup: Thanks Garth, I spotted a little pic of Doon avec Alvari in the TV page of the TV supplement.. and thought I'll just have a wee watch.. it was amusing enough, too, especially the bit where she prances around with it to tune of Scotland The Brave: "Here comes the highland granny, great big....." lol...

And maugein.. :tup:
 

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