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Three diagrams to compare the CBA to a standard piano keyboa

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Daddy Long Les

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These three diagrams (attached) may help de-mystify the way that a CBA (B system) compares to a standard keyboard.

I've only shown one octave and the three outside rows. Again, this would have helped me to understand the layout as a complete beginner so hopefully it may be of interest to others out there.
 

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Soulsaver

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Useful to us that don't know, thanks - really clear. What the difference between B vs C system?
 
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Daddy Long Les

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Soulsaver said:
Useful to us that dont know, thanks - really clear. What the difference between B vs C system?
The diagonal goes the other way - simply move the notes on the top row - A, C, D# and F# (middle row of a 5 row instrument) to the bottom row (outside row)and the notes on the bottom row B, D, F and G# to the top. The notes on the second row - A#, C#, E and G stay the same.
 

jarvo

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Right ,okay see the logic in the layout ,clever.......but why "The three outside rows" what are the other rows and are they not a nuisance.......?..............necessary ?.........

according to my Roland manual charts the innermost row of a 4 row repeats the first row............. :cry: If there was an emoticon of an exploding head ,I would have used that..............
 

george garside

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I have never found a need for a diagram comparing ppiano anad continental keyboards. Assuming that would be students are at least familier with some of the more common scales working these out from a keyboard chart is dead easy and so doing helps to stick it in the mind and put it into In respect of the C system the key of C starts on te outside row and using only the outside 3 rows it is not rocket science to see where CDEFGABC is!.

If you want the quickie way of playing this scale will work for 12 major keys , just starting on the keynote ( on one or other of the 3 outside rows ) and doing exactly the same .A better method is to plot the scales using just the outside 3 rows which means 3 scales of patterns for 12 ;keys.

In answer to the question why learn on 3 rows when you may haave 4 or 5 playing the bulk of a tune on the outside 3 lends itself to easier fast fingering aand easier key changes. It also keeps the hand and fingers in a more comfortable position much of the time. The 4th row , favoured by the French) provides some useful choice in order to facilitate some difficult bits of fingering ( depending of course on the tune) and is enough for most purposed.. the 5th (inside row) does a bit more of the same but is less essential.

The advantage of learning the 3 fingering patterns does not become apparent until reasonable proficience is achieved ( I learned the lazy way using one fingering pattern and eventually decided to relearn using the 3. It would have saved a lot of effort if I had gone up the 3 scale route from the start.

george
 

jarvo

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..I do...but no-one else seems to like it :cry:
 
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