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The appearance of the bandoneon in tango music

JerryPH

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Some inconsistency in the book... on page 3 they show a clear picture of a Chinese Sheng, and discuss that this sound was known in Europe. At best, a bad choices of pics for the paragraph discussed, at worst, bad info. ;)
 

bluesette

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Some inconsistency in the book... on page 3 they show a clear picture of a Chinese Sheng, and discuss that this sound was known in Europe. At best, a bad choices of pics for the paragraph discussed, at worst, bad info. ;)

So what JerryPH ?

This is NOT a book. The text, pictures and Web links were edited on a Web blog by Marcelo Solis :
https://escuelatangoba.com/marcelosolis/history-of-tango-part-5/

I found the Part-5 (related to bandoneon) on the Web as a pdf file at https://www.academia.edu/ and thought it could be of interest for people who like tango & bandoneon. The other web blog Parts 1-9 (related to tango history) are also availlable there as pdf files.

The text says:
"The oldest known musical instrument that uses this method is the Cheng, a “mouth organ”, already used in China on 700 AC, made of several bamboo canes (13 to 36) which had inside the vibrating membranes and a gourd as response box. The air flow was produced by blowing on it, like a flute. During the 1800s this principle of production of sound was known in Europe, from which derived many diverse instruments, some in use still today, like the harmonica, the harmonium, the accordions and the concertinas, which is considered the immediate ancestor of the bandoneon."

imho :
Nothing wrong with above text. This is only a page layout problem on the pdf !
The Cheng picture is related to the text above picture and should be on the previous page, but the vertical format of the Cheng picture pushed it on the next page. So what ?

PS : ce pdf est destiné aux fans de tango et de bandonéon. Donc, le Cheng on s'en temponne un peu le coquillard, non ?
Désolé si ça t'empêche de dormir :)
 
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dunlustin

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I like the idea of the Sheng (or cheng) being mentioned in a history of any free reed instrument.
Although known perhaps before, I believe it was a Jesuit - Père Amiot -who started the story that led to the concertina etc.
It's good to remember that European inventions often have an earlier history.
And the Sheng is still a pretty amazing instrument:


PS Tangos are great too.
 

bluesette

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I like the idea of the Sheng (or cheng) being mentioned in a history of any free reed instrument.
I do agree with you : the Cheng (Sheng) is the ancestor of all free reed instruments.

imo :
The Cheng (Sheng) has tuned tube resonators, so one of the closer descendent (with keyboard) would be the Claviola : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claviola
 

JerryPH

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So what JerryPH ?

This is NOT a book. The text, pictures and Web links were edited on a Web blog by Marcelo Solis :
https://escuelatangoba.com/marcelosolis/history-of-tango-part-5/

I found the Part-5 (related to bandoneon) on the Web as a pdf file at https://www.academia.edu/ and thought it could be of interest for people who like tango & bandoneon. The other web blog Parts 1-9 (related to tango history) are also availlable there as pdf files.

The text says:
"The oldest known musical instrument that uses this method is the Cheng, a “mouth organ”, already used in China on 700 AC, made of
several bamboo canes (13 to 36) which had inside the vibrating membranes and a gourd as response box. The air flow was produced
by blowing on it, like a flute. During the 1800s this principle of production of sound was known in Europe, from which derived many diverse instruments, some in use still today, like the harmonica, the harmonium, the accordions and the concertinas, which is considered the immediate ancestor of the bandoneon."

imho :
Nothing wrong with above text. This is only a page layout problem on the pdf !
The Cheng picture is related to the text above picture and should be on the previous page, but the vertical format of the Cheng picture pushed it on the next page. So what ?

PS : ce pdf est destiné aux fans de tango et de bandonéon. Donc, le Cheng on s'en temponne un peu le coquillard, non ?
Désolé si ça t'empêche de dormir :)
Pas de tout, Mais is tu partage une document, au minimum etre sur que l’info est correct. example, ca s’appel SHENG et non CHENG. :)
If they cannot even get the name right, it casts doubt on the validity of the rest of the info.

Feeling a little aggressive, aren’t we? ;)
 

Dingo40

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Dunlustin,
Thanks for sharing the clip.??
I often wondered what a cheng sounded like ?.
Quite pleasing ?.
The world is full of surprises!?
 

Ffingers

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Dunlustin,
Thanks for sharing the clip.??
I often wondered what a cheng sounded like ?.
Quite pleasing ?.
The world is full of surprises!?
Not least on youtube where their algorithm led me to a raft of more sheng playing, including an orchestra of various sized instruments which is based in Singapore.

"Every day is a school day."
 

Dingo40

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I can see the sheng becoming the latest "must have " for some members of this forum!?
See here for more:
 

Tom

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Let's all be friends and make beautiful music on our accordions, life is too short as it is!
 
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bluesette

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Besides, maybe Canadian French is different from French French,
No: the spelling of French is the same all over the world. Only the vocabulary differs from one country to another.

For example: JerryPH would translate:
"I'am a little bit muddy"
into French as:
"J'ai une petite bite molle" :)
 
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bluesette

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Well, thank you Tom for these kind words that warm my heart, :)
but,
Howewer, JerryPH is right on one point: the spelling of the first letter is verry important because:
a "pussy" could become (multiple choice allowed):
bussy, cussy, fussy, gussy, kussy, lussy, mussy, nussy, tussy, vussy, wussy and/or zussy :)
 

Valski

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Gerry PH is an amazing authority on all things accordion. He is also generous with his time and willingly assists others with practical advice in many areas of this forum. That said, we are corresponding in English with members from all over the world and it's possible that sometimes something does not sit right with another member. My suggestion is to "count to ten" and to look at our own contributions to a particular thread to see if something written could be misconstrued.
I've spoken English my entire life and have a respectable vocabulary, but sometimes my posts don't seem to convey exactly what they were meant to say. Let's all take a deep breath and agree not to become overly agitated.
 

knobby

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Let's all take a deep breath and agree not to become overly agitated.
Yes, let's do that - keep it pleasant please?

And may I take this opportunity to remind people that although we have members from all over the world, the language of the forum is English.
 

Ffingers

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Valski: "...but sometimes my posts don't seem to convey exactly what they were meant to say."
The written word is subject to interpretation by a reader who may not be familiar with the vernacular of the writer.
It is best to be very precise, concise and to use standard English when writing, as well as to accept that others may not be familiar with your society's uses of idiom and euphemisms.
On the other hand, the tendency for some people to mock others' lack of linguistic ability and/or typographical errors is both unkind and aggressive; displaying, of course, their own lack of decency.
English is a language which has very many flavours (flavors?) and much regional/societal variation.
So please be kind, both to yourselves and to others.
 

Valski

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Valski: "...but sometimes my posts don't seem to convey exactly what they were meant to say."
The written word is subject to interpretation by a reader who may not be familiar with the vernacular of the writer.
It is best to be very precise, concise and to use standard English when writing, as well as to accept that others may not be familiar with your society's uses of idiom and euphemisms.
On the other hand, the tendency for some people to mock others' lack of linguistic ability and/or typographical errors is both unkind and aggressive; displaying, of course, their own lack of decency.
English is a language which has very many flavours (flavors?) and much regional/societal variation.
So please be kind, both to yourselves and to others.

Exactly ffingers, we all know what we want to say, however sometimes despite good intentions the thoughts that we try to convey don't come across exactly as we would have liked. The English language is funny that way because at one level it's the easiest to use, however it's highly nuanced and meaning can be misunderstood. I was hoping that everyone would stop for a second and not take offense at every comment and discussion point. The comments were getting out of hand and cool heads are the best solution to this.

By the way, in Canada we use flavours and colours and we also write cheques when paying an invoice. Spell check sometimes shows the alternative spelling. :unsure: :geek:(y)
 

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