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Swiss Variety

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maugein96

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A selection of three accordion styles corresponding to the principal languages spoken in Switzerland. Not necessarily folk music, but typical nevertheless.

German:-
French:-
Italian:- (Ticino):-
EDIT:- I had originally put on another clip which I believed represented music of the Romansch speaking regions, but cannot now confirm whether that was in fact the case. I have removed the clip concerned.
 
M

maugein96

Guest
OK, Im biased towards the French influenced accordion styles in Switzerland, so heres a whole accordion club who agree with my choice!

 

xocd

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maugein96 post_id=60949 time=1531086296 user_id=607 said:
Clip 4 has German subtitles. Rumantsch sounds like German, but is obviously different enough to warrant its own status in parts of Switzerland. It only has official status in certain regions. Sorry but you need to wait for the music in the 4th clip, but it is quite pleasant.

Romansch is a group of latin-derived languages.

Here is an example of written Rumantsch Grischun(from Wikipedia)
La vulp era puspè ina giada fomentada.
Qua ha ella vis sin in pign in corv che tegneva in toc chaschiel en ses pichel.
Quai ma gustass, ha ella pensà, ed ha clamà al corv: «Tge bel che ti es! Sche tes chant è uschè bel sco tia parita, lur es ti il pli bel utschè da tuts».

I, Spanish speaker, cannot make head or tails of the spoken Romansch in the video. I can get an inkling of the sense in the written text above.
 
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maugein96

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xocd post_id=60977 time=1531166366 user_id=2246 said:
Romansch is a group of latin-derived languages.


Sorry, I was going to leave Romansch out altogether as I did not really know much about it at all, other than it had official status in the Grischun area you mentioned. I knew it was supposed to be nearer Latin than German, but Ive only been to the south western part of Switzerland, where French (of a sort) is spoken. I know German speaking people who live in Biel/Bienne, but that city is officially bilingual and they use a lot of French words.

I would have said the guy doing the intro was speaking a German dialect but the subtitles threw me, and the clip was from something called Rumantsch TV. Having never heard the language being spoken before, I made the assumption that it must have Germanic undertones, but youve proved me wrong there. I should have made it clear in the post that I wasnt entirely sure of the situation.

Romansch in Switzerland is like Gaelic in Scotland, and only around 1% of the total population can speak it. No Swiss person Ive ever met professes to have knowledge of the Romansch/Rumantsch language. They have all heard of it, but thats about the limit.

With the benefit of hindsight I should have stuck with the Big 3 at the risk of upsetting 1% of any Swiss forum members.

Thanks for putting me straight, and Ill take the clip out in case it is not representative of the music of Romansch speakers at all.
 
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