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Roland Fr3xb problem

Pipemajor

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I have a Roland Fr3xb.
The other day I had been playing for about 20 minutes when the G4 button became silent. The tune I was playing at the time (Alpine Slopes) has multiple G triplets and it was only when I started playing this tune that the problem appeared. All the other notes worked fine. I tried selecting a different octave for the G4 button but none worked which would suggest it was a problem with the button itself.
After about 5 minutes the note the re-appeared and worked fine until I tried playing repeated Gs when it went again. This continued until I finally gave up and stopped playing.
I was unable to play it for the next couple of days but last night I tried again and started with "Alpine Slopes" and it worked properly I continued playing and again after about 20 minutes the G4 button fell silent, repeating the same results as last time, coming back after about 5 minutes then going again.
I haven't tried the midi out yet, so I can't totally rule out an electronic problem .
I would be grateful for any comments/advice from the experts here but I think I'm going to have to see if there is a Roland service centre near here.😢
 

Ventura

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you are correct to proceed with testing the G4 as a MIDI out event
the next time it happens, then you will know if it is a software glitch
of the internal sound module, or an intermittent physical/software problem
of the entire system
 

Pipemajor

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Thanks Ventura, I checked it using the Midi out and got the same problem although it now seems to be happening quicker, so I would think this would point to switch problem.
 

Ventura

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i do not know exactly the physical switching system used on the
button treble version, but the keyboard versions used the rubbery top-hat style
"switches" on the long circuitboard under the keys

they tested them on machines a million strokes
BUT
tested them lying flat

we play them up and down,

and so they never noticed that the top-hats distended their base a
tiny bit, just enough to allow cat hairs and such to slip under the
edges (fed by gravity) and eventually interfere with switching integrity

i do not know if they ever corrected this, or if your 3x would have a similar
weakness in the design, but it is worth a look if you can dis-assemble it
just enough to look under the keyboard and check under that switch for dirt/dust/etc.
 

pentaprism

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this would point to switch problem.
Bummer!
they tested them on machines a million strokes
BUT
tested them lying flat

we play them up and down,
I don't think it has to do with testing flat and playing up and down. On my wife's Roland KR-107 piano, when it was about 12 yrs old, some of the keys had uncontrollable volume (each switch under the key has 2 contacts for velocity sensitivity). I ended up replacing the switches under the keys (all 88 of them). I think Roland must have tested the switches laying flat a million strokes. But I don't think my wife had hit the keys a million times in 12 years and I know she hadn't played them up and down.

On something like the Roland KR-107, cleaning the contacts can fix the problem. But I don't know if there is a way to access the contacts on a V-accordion.
 

Pipemajor

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One thing I neglected to test was the 5th row G button.
I tried this evening and found that the 5th row G does indeed sound when the 2nd row G is silent.
I think this would point to the switch being the problem.
Just need to find out how to remove the buttons and the keyboard case to check the switch.
 

davidplaysaccordion

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Systems with a lot of contacts often use a multiplexed array to reduce the number of wires needed. Each switch is a row and column on a grid pattern array which the electronics polls in turn. There would be a diode across each junction to prevent back flow to other nodes on the same row/column so it is possible that the diode at that junction (assuming it uses this system) is going out.
 

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