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Removing Excess Wax?

knobby

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Well I had my first attempt at waxing in some reeds today: Let's say it's functional rather than aesthetically pleasing. But I did dribble a couple of times and ended up with some wax on the top of the reed block and a couple of spots on a couple of reed plates, where the valve would seat (I haven't fitted the new valves on the outside yet.
What can I use to remove this excess wax? i hadn't realised just how sticky it actually is! I tried some nail varnish remover which worked on my fingers but just succeeded in removing the varnish from the reed blocks while leaving the wax in place!
 

debra

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Use benzene, sometimes called naphta, called "wasbenzine" in dutch... It's a product sold to clean fabric. Others use (the purest possible) alcohol. It may take quite a bit of rubbing to get the wax off. You do not want even the slightest feeling of stickiness.
Take my advice that I have given many times: as a beginner with wax (which is what I consider myself to be) put strips of painters tape on the reed plates, just leaving the space between the plates open. Any spills of wax will be on the tape and not on the reed plates. When you remove the tape (while the wax is still quite warm) the excess wax comes off with the tape, leaving a very nicely filled space between the reed plates. People will say that using the tape is a slow process, but my experiences tells me it is way faster to use the tape than not to use it and make a mess on the reed plates instead.
 

Tom

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Great advice, Paul, thanks!
 

Ventura

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waaaaaaaaaaay faster

the first wax repair i tried as a teenager was
with a dripping red candle

i have come a long way since

as a general trick, Soldering Guns (like the Weller Pistol type)
have a tip available that is a flat semi-circle

it is easy to "trigger" the gun to just enough for quick melting
and it fits between reeds and can hold a drop then tipping it
is an easy spot touchup

it is also possible to make strings of reedwax in your Kitchen
(when your Wife is not looking)
and you can "solder" wax into place

this is by no means a better way, and takes more time, but
for beginners or only spot repair, it is an alternative to a
smoky HotPot full of reedwax

and even just running the tip along the top of the reedplates
will refresh and reseal a good bit of crackly wax that is not
in terrible dried out condition, and will get you through a few more
years of use

fresh wax is better, of course, because having the Volatiles in
the fresh Wax is also good for the interior health of an Accordion
with leather valves and other components
 

Ventura

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Others use (the purest possible) alcohol.

here in the USA 91% bottles of Alcohol are readily
available from the local WalMart stores, or from their website

also great for cleaning most accordion surfaces, AND
the screen on your SmartPhone
or the grungy Keypad on my FlipPhone
 

Dingo40

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Knobby,
Here, in Australia, we have available a pure "organic" ( as opposed to " mineral ") turpentine which dissolves natural waxes ( eg beeswax) readily.
This should work on your accordion wax.
You may have a similar product in your local hardware store?🤔
See here:
 

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