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Question about this Pancordion registers

ArtMustel

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Hello, I'm looking at a picture of a Pancordion PA model Baton #1358. It is LMMH and it appears to have 4 registers on the treble side, but since I am not familiar with this kind of registers layout I wanted to ask in case you knew what every of the 4 register bars are. For instance, I see one with one mark, so it is bassoon or clarinet or piccolo? Then there is another with 2 marks, probably Violin, one with 3 marks and the one with 4 that should be master. If anyone knows anything about this model registers I will appreciate your help.

pancordion.jpg
 
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ArtMustel

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It could be but then the markings wouldn't make much sense but you might be right. Thank you Scuromondo.
Oh, I just read something about them and I believe you are correct. I was thinking wrongly that the marks referred to 1, 2, 3 or 4 voices but it rather seem to be first mark is for piccolo, 2 marks for Clarinet, 3 marks for Clarinet+ and 4 marks for bassoon, and they work single or combined. :)
 
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Ventura

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more pics would help...

i personally have never seen a flapper Pan that was not modernized
for the switching assignments, the same as any push shift 3, 5, 7, or 9 type

was it a custom request ? perhaps... i have been told the Flappers were
actually designed and first appeared on New York made Pans, but i have
only ever seen the Myron style (NewYork) Pan in the flesh, with the
voluptuous shift arrangement

so it may be possible it is a very early USA made Pan with a
"similar to excelsior" 4 rocker shift setup

because of the Dating of Italy built Pans (Cruicinelli) it is
difficult to imagine a rocker style setup coming from them

only way to know is open that sucker up
 

ArtMustel

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There is a youtube video of an accordionist playing a similar instrument, however he made it midi and it won't help much:


I will try to get more pictures of the one I posted, I hope they won't mind me opening it to take pics of the treble and bass reed blocks.

Thank you.
 

Scuromondo

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There is a youtube video of an accordionist playing a similar instrument, however he made it midi and it won't help much:


I will try to get more pictures of the one I posted, I hope they won't mind me opening it to take pics of the treble and bass reed blocks.

Thank you.
If you physically have access to the accordion, you should not need to open it up, it should be fairly obvious by listening to it in the various switch positions.
 

ArtMustel

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If you physically have access to the accordion, you should not need to open it up, it should be fairly obvious by listening to it in the various switch positions.
That is right scuoromondo but anyway I am curious about it and wanted to look at the reed and leather condition and take pics of them. Thank you!
 

nagant27

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These pans are like the 00 excelsior rocker stitches. Usually LMMH where you turn on or off or partially open the slider as desired. A lot of the early USA pans are converted to lmmm but same design. They are really nice accordions and hard to find. I’ve watched videos of Joey miskulin playing them and he seems to be the expert on them and he plays like a boss!
 

Ventura

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if this is indeed true, then it is a way to identify some American built Pans

and in that case, if you find one and it is not priced out of reach,
definitely get it

personally i tend to think the USA Pans were very seldom equaled
(outside of special orders or custom runs)
by the Italian substitutes

i also feel there are not many to be found in "circulation" anymore
 

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