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Newbie base scale question

julianc

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I am getting on fine learning to play, but I have a question concerning the bass scale which I hope someone can explain.

My base is a 120 button Stradella

As far as I can work out, I cannot play a full 8 note ascending (or descending )scale in the left hand. For instance the buttons which make up the Cmajor scale (CDEFGABC) play C3,D3, E2, F2, G2, A2, B2, C3. There is a jump from D3 down to E2.

What am I missing?

A piece I am learning Smetana Bartered Bride, has a bass score which requires C2, D2, E2, F2. It seems C2 and D2 cannot be played.
 

Glenn

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Indeed this is a feature of the Stradella bass system. Embrace it. The break point may be different between makes and models of accordions but will always be a design feature somewhere. If the descending or ascending run if absolutely critical then you will have to use a free-bass accordion (or converter which switches between the two systems).
 

debra

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As Glenn already pointed out this is a property of the standard bass system and the break point may be different between makes and models of accordions. But there is more to it. The bass has 4 or 5 sets of reeds. One of these (typically the 3rd) has the break at a different point than the other sets of reeds. This is done to hide the break point (or octave jump) a bit. This is a feeble attempt to achieve what is otherwise known as the Shepard tone. The Shepard tone is a way to create a 12 note scale using different octaves and different volume of each octave for each note so that when you reach the first note again the scale seamlessly continues, so you do not hear any octave jump even and can keep playing scales up without actually going up.
Some accordions are better than others in "hiding" the octave jump, but no accordion actually achieves the Shepart tone.
 
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