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Musical notation question

Dingo40

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Hi all, new here from Oz, but have been lurking for some weeks and soaking up the great information on all things accordion to be found here!<EMOJI seq="1f642">?</EMOJI>
I have several PAs in various makes and sizes, but have been a more successful collector than performer<EMOJI seq="1f615">?</EMOJI>
I have a naive notation question:
In a (simple) score I’m learning to play, in the key of G major, in a measure, a given note E is marked with an accidental sharp, making it an effective F.
However, all Fs in the key signature age F sharp, so I’m guessing this note too must be played as an F sharp.
Am I right?<EMOJI seq="1f610">?</EMOJI>
Thanks in anticipation <EMOJI seq="1f642">?</EMOJI>
 

fjsys

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no you would just play an E# (or an F)
This is done usually to make it easier to read and not have to put both a F natural and then an F# into the music again.

Ben
 

JIM D.

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Ben is correct;
In some older publications, to play an F in the key of G, D, A, E & B the notation E# is used. (traditional)
However in newer publications you will find a F natural notation in its stead. (preferred, and an advantage in sight reading)
To understand better the accidentals used see here --
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accidental_(music)
 

Acon

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Hi Dingo40,

As mentioned by others, in a G Major tune if a note is marked as E# it should be played as the pitch of F (it's the sixth note half note sharper on its diatonic scale), but all notes marked as original F should be played as the pitch of F# (it's the seventh note of its diatonic scale).

"Diatonic scale" means the major scale we usually sing as Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Ti (Si) in most English language countries.

Some more details about note singing (solfege) can be described here but it's a little complicated depending on where do you live (solfege education differs country by country), but the point is E# and F play different roles on the scale and sing differently so they can't be seen/played on the same pitch.

Following the same thought, the F marked natural is the seventh note half note flat on its diatonic scale which sings differently as well, even though it's played with the same pitch as E# on same white key (or button).

By the way where are you from in Australia? I live in Brisbane but couldn't find too many accordion lover here :| .
 

Dingo40

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Hi Folks, very glad to be back!<EMOJI seq="1f642">?</EMOJI>
You’d never believe it, but I had a dreadful hitch with my password immediately after my maiden post and it has taken all the time since to get back into the forum<EMOJI seq="1f604">?</EMOJI>.
First, I’d like to thank all of you who replied for your information which was most helpful and did the trick!<EMOJI seq="1f44d">?</EMOJI>
It is true that my score is quite old, from a Dutch album of intermediate level (hard but manageable for me, with time) printed in the early 1960s.
I’m located in South Australia, out of Adelaide at Murray Bridge.
In the nineties we had a weekly group of enthusiastic beginners, meeting in a room provided by a friendly community college in Adelaide, presided over by a qualified teacher of accordion. Unfortunately, we have gone our separate ways, many to the great auditorium in the sky!
I myself have only recently recommended playing after a long hiatus, but -in the words of Maxwell Smart,”And loving it!”
 

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