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Meaning of "N" as in Hohner Student II N?

Reed Bellows

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Hi all...my first post on this forum. At 50 yrs old I've finally decided to take up a new instrument which I've always admired from afar...the accordion of course. I've played guitar for 30 years but never played accordion or any keyboard for that matter.

A friend of a friend is willing to sell his old (though apparently in great condition) Hohner Student II N for really cheap. I figured it's a good starting point.

I researching the Hohner Student accordions on google, I noticed most are either M, MM, or no suffix designation at all. This one is a Student II N. I cannot find anywhere that the "N" stands for. Can anyone please let me what the "N" means?

Thank you!

Joe
 

Scuromondo

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The Hohner Accordion List on this forum does not include a Student II N, but it does mention a Student IV N. The IV is a 25/32 instrument while the IV N is 26/40.
 

Reed Bellows

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The Hohner Accordion List on this forum does not include a Student II N, but it does mention a Student IV N. The IV is a 25/32 instrument while the IV N is 26/40.
Appreciated your reply. It's weird that I can find nothing about the Student II N, but I've attached a photo to show it exists!w30986-myFile-1621558322340.jpeg
 

debra

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Hi all...my first post on this forum. At 50 yrs old I've finally decided to take up a new instrument which I've always admired from afar...the accordion of course. I've played guitar for 30 years but never played accordion or any keyboard for that matter.

A friend of a friend is willing to sell his old (though apparently in great condition) Hohner Student II N for really cheap. I figured it's a good starting point.

I researching the Hohner Student accordions on google, I noticed most are either M, MM, or no suffix designation at all. This one is a Student II N. I cannot find anywhere that the "N" stands for. Can anyone please let me what the "N" means?

Thank you!

Joe
Some models started with no additional letter. Some old accordions have something like M (PA) or D (CBA)... the N series then came later, and for some models followed by an S series and even later by a T series... Hohner also did not use very strong glue for the letters (and neither did some Italian accordion makers) so the accordions may also lose letters, even already after just a few years...
 

Reed Bellows

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Some models started with no additional letter. Some old accordions have something like M (PA) or D (CBA)... the N series then came later, and for some models followed by an S series and even later by a T series... Hohner also did not use very strong glue for the letters (and neither did some Italian accordion makers) so the accordions may also lose letters, even already after just a few years...
Thank you. I've come to the conclusion from your reply and the others that the N is simply as you say...a sequential series designation, and not a reference to any internal mechanics or tuning.
 

debra

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Thank you. I've come to the conclusion from your reply and the others that the N is simply as you say...a sequential series designation, and not a reference to any internal mechanics or tuning.
In some sense the N and other letters do indicate a change of "internal mechanics or tuning" as each subsequent series has some design changes. This is most obvious in the move from unmarked or M (or D) series to the later N series when you look at the register buttons. Another change is that some older accordions had an internal bellows-locking mechanism and later series had bellow straps. And mechanics have also changed going from N to S, like in the Morino accordions. the most visible change there is the way the grille is held in place, with a lever in N and with decorative bolts in S, to prevent the grille to fall off mid-performance...
 

Cheshire Chris

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Seems to be quite common with Hohner models. I have a Hohner Concerto III, and they too went to N, then S, and finally T (mine is an "S").
 

debra

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Seems to be quite common with Hohner models. I have a Hohner Concerto III, and they too went to N, then S, and finally T (mine is an "S").
And what they perhaps should have done is to then continue with "C" for "made in China"... (not for the higher end models which have been made and are still made in Italy).
 

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