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Masquerade Waltz

wirralaccordion

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Done quite a lot of practice and feel that this is about as good as it gets ( which isn't very good ). After a certain amount of practice you actually reach your peak and thereafter it's downhill! ( for me )
The biggest jump possible is covered in this waltz ( C to F# = 6 root bass buttons on the root row ) and if reaching it successfully, such is my relief that it causes me to forget to play the matching note in the right hand!
Any comments on making these jumps very welcome.

 

losthobos

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Can you get away with the F# counter row above D on your way through.... Just idea...
 

dunlustin

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Very enjoyable.
I enjoyed the Snowman even more - you seemed more relaxed and enjoying yourself.
Perhaps it'll be the same with Masquerade in time.
Don't we all have tunes where we're thinking 'That hard bit is coming up...getting closer...nearly there ...... Oh; b****r!
 

debra

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Done quite a lot of practice and feel that this is about as good as it gets ( which isn't very good ). After a certain amount of practice you actually reach your peak and thereafter it's downhill! ( for me )
The biggest jump possible is covered in this waltz ( C to F# = 6 root bass buttons on the root row ) and if reaching it successfully, such is my relief that it causes me to forget to play the matching note in the right hand!
Any comments on making these jumps very welcome.
This is quite a challenging piece, and a good exercise for bass jumps!
I made an arrangement for accordion orchestra that we played (in Helmond, the Netherlands) and with a whole orchestra it's already difficult enough. When you try everything solo on just one accordion that just makes it even a lot harder...
Sadly I do not have a good recording of our group performance of my arrangement...
 

Pipemajor

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Very well done Phil (y) .
I've been practicing Bourrasque for some time now and the first three bars of the intro jump from G to G# then to A on the left hand !!
The jump from G to G# isn't too bad as both buttons have markers on them but the jump up to A is a leap in the dark and, no matter how often I practice it, it's still hit or miss. I'm very much tempted to forget the into and just play the tune but that would be admitting defeat so I'll just keep plodding on :(
 

debra

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Very well done Phil (y) .
I've been practicing Bourrasque for some time now and the first three bars of the intro jump from G to G# then to A on the left hand !!
The jump from G to G# isn't too bad as both buttons have markers on them but the jump up to A is a leap in the dark and, no matter how often I practice it, it's still hit or miss. I'm very much tempted to forget the into and just play the tune but that would be admitting defeat so I'll just keep plodding on :(
In Bourrasque (depends on what you have in your arrangement) you can play G and G# (take G# as third of E) just as single base notes and then A with or without chord. Easy. (What follows is of course difficult, but that's difficult for the right hand.)
 

Pipemajor

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In Bourrasque (depends on what you have in your arrangement) you can play G and G# (take G# as third of E) just as single base notes and then A with or without chord. Easy. (What follows is of course difficult, but that's difficult for the right hand.)
Yes that is the easy way but the sheet music has both the base note and chords combined in the left hand and that is where the problem lies.
The right hand is coming along nicely. I have trouble still with the triplets in the second part but I'm working on it (slowly) :cautious:
 

wirralaccordion

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Sheet music is intended to be interpreted, not played literally as written.
A good example of this is where you have an alternating bass ( root ) note played against the same bass chord, particularly in waltz time ( 3/4 ).
Say you have a bass line that is written G,CM,CM/C,CM,CM/G,GM,GM/C,GM,GM and you find it difficult to reach the first G from the note before it. Solution is to play the run as C,CM,CM/G,CM,CM/C,CM,CM/G,CM,CM. The alternating bass ( root ) note still makes the music more "interesting" as before but it would take a very keen ear to notice the change you have made.
 

wirralaccordion

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It took me a while, but here is my own version (played as accordion orchestra Professor P, so not a fair comparison to a solo performance):
Superb Paul. I could listen to that over and over again. Thanks
 

Jim2010

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Wow, Paul. It sounds like a performance by a group of talented musicians who are having a great time playing together.
 

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