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'Marking' CBA keys

Javthedog

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My Paolo Soprani CBA (C system ) has all white keys.....doesn't matter what colour they are as I can't see them!.......I was advised to mark the C F and G keys with something I could feel - as a guide. I used some rough textured plastic discs that I stamped from a sheet and stuck them on with fine quality double sided tape - not at that stage wanting anything that was not reversible. After about 8 months, a couple of the discs are starting to move and I'm thinking of a more permanent solution. Has anybody got any suggestions re the best markers to use, where on the key to place it and whether or not something glued into a newly drilled hole would be best. Thanks in advance for your comments.
 
If you are lucky then the accordion has screw-on buttons so you can just order new white textured buttons (screw-in type) of the right size and replace the ones you choose. If you end up not liking it in the end it's easy to remove a button and put the old one in.
If you are unlucky then the stupid accordion manufacturer has decided to use glue-on buttons and then it becomes a mess to try to remove buttons and replace them. I have absolutely no idea why some manufacturers (like Pigini) decided that glued-on buttons was a good idea, especially since you cannot remove the plate that's under the buttons without removing all the buttons, and if for some reason (like an accident) you need to remove the whole keyboard you must remove that plate.

That said, most accordions come with the C and F buttons marked (using textured buttons).
Until now I have seen only one manufacturer who systematically did it in a different way: Hohner. They have A, C# and G# marked... Was this just to be different? I don't know. It's a pain when you switch between accordions (as I do).
 
That said, most accordions come with the C and F buttons marked (using textured buttons).
Until now I have seen only one manufacturer who systematically did it in a different way: Hohner. They have A, C# and G# marked... Was this just to be different? I don't know. It's a pain when you switch between accordions (as I do).
It differs with Hohner. I have C/G/D (and C/F on the free bass). Yours is the first time I hear of any combination that doesn't include C, whether Hohner or not. I think a more typical Hohner set was probably C/A♭/E, the same as the marked standard bass buttons and a somewhat more geometric layout than mine. I think C/F is comparatively common, but Hohner has a marked button in every row. Incidentally, comparing the location of the marked buttons in 1st and 4th row is a reliable way of distinguishing C and B systems on photographs.
 
My Paolo Soprani CBA (C system ) has all white keys.....doesn't matter what colour they are as I can't see them!.......I was advised to mark the C F and G keys with something I could feel - as a guide. I used some rough textured plastic discs that I stamped from a sheet and stuck them on with fine quality double sided tape - not at that stage wanting anything that was not reversible. After about 8 months, a couple of the discs are starting to move and I'm thinking of a more permanent solution. Has anybody got any suggestions re the best markers to use, where on the key to place it and whether or not something glued into a newly drilled hole would be best. Thanks in advance for your comments.
I used velcro round "dots" I bought on ebay, also on my Paulo Soprani CBA.
They are self adhesive so just stick the on where you want them.
As they are in pairs, you can choose the "rough" or "smooth" dot depending on the sensitivity you need.
 
It differs with Hohner. I have C/G/D (and C/F on the free bass). Yours is the first time I hear of any combination that doesn't include C, whether Hohner or not. I think a more typical Hohner set was probably C/A♭/E, the same as the marked standard bass buttons and a somewhat more geometric layout than mine. I think C/F is comparatively common, but Hohner has a marked button in every row. Incidentally, comparing the location of the marked buttons in 1st and 4th row is a reliable way of distinguishing C and B systems on photographs.
Interesting. A while ago I did tuning on a Hohner Artiste VI S prototype (with cassotto, whereas the production models do not have cassotto) and it had A, C#, G# marked just like mine.
(Mine does have the C's marked in the MIII melody bass, which complicates things further...)
I believe these Hohners that were made by Excelsior also have glued-on buttons.
 
Interesting. A while ago I did tuning on a Hohner Artiste VI S prototype (with cassotto, whereas the production models do not have cassotto) and it had A, C#, G# marked just like mine.
Come to think of it, I don't have that much hands-on experience and some of my "it must be C" conviction might have come from looking at photographs without hearing the corresponding sound. So you've provided some more information good for shaking my head. I will need to focus on pictures of accordions I know the range of. For what it's worth, my own instrument is from 1960.
 
That said, most accordions come with the C and F buttons marked (using textured buttons).
Until now I have seen only one manufacturer who systematically did it in a different way: Hohner. They have A, C# and G# marked... Was this just to be different? I don't know. It's a pain when you switch between accordions (as I do).
My Maugein Dauphin (4-row C-system CBA, 37 notes treble + duplicate buttons as well) only has the C notes marked with textured buttons. And even then only those on the first (outer) row, not the fourth (inner) row duplicates. It doesn't bother me at all. C is my core anchor point, and I'm happy to work from that. This accordion's treble buttons are all black too, which works fine for me as well. I'm only looking at them some of the time, and again have that textured C as an anchor. I don't know about other French CBA brands, but wouldn't be surprised if many were similar re C only marked.
 
^ I think that would drive me mad!

on the treble side I have F marked with the dotted texture and C is scooped out (much like how free bass is marked). I've not seen any other accordions like this, but if I were to ever get another I'd request for the same configuration again
 
God, the Saltarelle Bourroche in black--it's fab looking. Like their Irish 2-row bisonorics, also offered in the wood look or in black. Swellegant on a CBA.

Not to veer off the runway too far, but speaking of CBAs with black buttons . . Do you guys think this one is plastic like those awful Pigini Peter Pans and the Maugein Marinitos or the rumored plastic Pigini Skywalkers? Or . . . ?

 
Thanks Pipemajor.......makes a lot more sense than cutting my own discs and sticking them with double sided tape. Lots of other interesting comments too - so thanks to all who contributed.
 
Until now I have seen only one manufacturer who systematically did it in a different way: Hohner. They have A, C# and G# marked... Was this just to be different? I don't know. It's a pain when you switch between accordions (as I do).
Hohner over the years really does go the distance when it comes to "innovative and unusual" choices. My 1931 model 2003 five row 4/4 C-griff has the "D's" marked. Works fine after you swear a bit when switching to it from "C" "F" which was the choice on all my other C-griff instruments.

Their reasoning? (from plastic beslided kitchen sink free bass and stradella at the same time Morino's - neato keeno if a bit weighty, on through curved keyboards, metal bodies, et al.... Several dwarves must have all moved on to Hohner accordions after the Gotterdammerung shut down the jewelry business)

Darned if I know which is best but frankly, pick a note, any note, mark it and after a few minutes playing one adapts and it works just fine as a reference- and a reference which is only really used when starting to play a tune. In the course of playing the markings really just don't enter into my thinking. As with the LH dimple on the C, feeling for it is my habit when first picking up the instrument but rarely if ever after that.

I just don't have the heart to go trying to twist the buttons off to relocate them and the design is such that the RH board beneath the buttons lifts right off over the buttons without any reason to molest them.

The stick on discs seems like a smart non-invasive and reversible way to mark the buttons to suit the user's preferences for marking.

To each his/her own.
 
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