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How I find the "second treble voice" or "contralto"

FireSpirit

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Hello guys!
I am learning to play only one note of the melody (In Brazil, I am used to saying "soprano"). In a sheet with only the soprano, how can I find the second voice (contralto)? I wanted to learn to play this song in this image below, but there is only the "soprano" and I would like to play the song with more notes than even this video below.
I apologize for the terms, I have no idea what the "second note" in English is called.digitalizar0001.jpg
 

TomBR

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With music intended for singers the two lines of music on the treble clef would normally be called Soprano (upper line) and Alto (lower line.)
(Then you'd have tenor and bass lines below that.)

Where you have two lines of music on the treble clef but it's not choir music I think they would generally be called Melody line and then Harmony line below that.
 

FireSpirit

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Hello guys!
Sorry for the misunderstanding. I am not very familiar with English yet and I asked a very poorly designed question.
I play only the melody, for now. But I see a lot of musicians playing "two notes" at the same time, and it gives me the impression that the sound is fuller and more beautiful
My question is: How do I play the "second note" by ear, which fits well with the melody?
 

FireSpirit

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Should be available on t'internet - example below is in F, better for congregational singing too! ( when allowed )

MuseScore can be a good places to find multi-voice arrangements.
In my church, we have a hymnbook that is SATB style. However, I don't know why, if I play the melody and the note below the melody, it sometimes seems very dissonant. Perhaps, this does not happen often in this song, but it happens in several. I talked to someone about it once, and he said "notes of passage". Does anyone know why this happens?
digitalizar0003.jpg

With music intended for singers the two lines of music on the treble clef would normally be called Soprano (upper line) and Alto (lower line.)
(Then you'd have tenor and bass lines below that.)

Where you have two lines of music on the treble clef but it's not choir music I think they would generally be called Melody line and then Harmony line below that.
Thanks for explanation!
 

Tom

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Olá Fire! You can try adding a note "a third" above or below the melody note. For example, if you are playing in the key of C, then "Do (dó)" is C. A third above would be E (mé). Apply this to each note of your melody. You can also try "chording," that is, (especially on long, held notes), add the notes of the chord indicated. For example, if you are playing a G in the key of C, add C and E below the G, etc. Good luck!
 

Tom

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A "passing tone" is a note that is not in the scale of the key you are in. It is used to go to another note in the scale. It adds interest. It won't sound good by itself, but will when the melody is playing, "in passing."
 
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In my church, we have a hymnbook that is SATB style. However, I don't know why, if I play the melody and the note below the melody, it sometimes seems very dissonant. Perhaps, this does not happen often in this song, but it happens in several. I talked to someone about it once, and he said "notes of passage". Does anyone know why this happens?
digitalizar0003.jpg


Thanks for explanation!

If you are playing the left hand based on the chord symbols, the chord in the red box is actually a D but you are playing G major in the left hand. Likewise, in the green box it is actually an A7 while you are playing G major in the left hand. Sometimes you can get away with it, sometimes you can't.

dpa_digitalizar0003.jpg
 

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