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Has anyone read any of these books?

Gatorcheesehead

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These books caught my eye.

Has anyone ready any of them? Any thoughts?

- Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain
by Oliver Sacks


- How Music Heals Us: Music, the Mind & the Metaphysical
by Kim Cannan


- Flute, Accordion or Clarinet?: Using the Characteristics of Our Instruments in Music Therapy
by Dawn Loombe, Jo Tomlinson, Amelia Oldfield, Henry Dunn, Catrin Piears-Banton

 
These books caught my eye.

Has anyone ready any of them? Any thoughts?

- Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain
by Oliver Sacks


- How Music Heals Us: Music, the Mind & the Metaphysical
by Kim Cannan


- Flute, Accordion or Clarinet?: Using the Characteristics of Our Instruments in Music Therapy
by Dawn Loombe, Jo Tomlinson, Amelia Oldfield, Henry Dunn, Catrin Piears-Banton

Hi Gator,

I read Musicophilia many years ago. Very interesting tales of the power of music to affect people.

I played music (guitar and accordion) for many years (6 or 8 ?) at an Alzheimer's support group (as have others on here), and can tell you music therapy with your accordion is super effective in bringing joy to people suffering from this. You won't make much money at it but it is super grarifying if you are into this sort of thing.
 
Hi Gator,

I read Musicophilia many years ago. Very interesting tales of the power of music to affect people.

I played music (guitar and accordion) for many years (6 or 8 ?) at an Alzheimer's support group (as have others on here), and can tell you music therapy with your accordion is super effective in bringing joy to people suffering from this. You won't make much money at it but it is super grarifying if you are into this sort of thing.
I teach science and gardening to elementary school kids, and I always have a toy accordion hanging around for them to fool with when we are gardening. I have an accordion in the classroom as well--you never know when you might need it!
I also managed to get outdoor musical instruments installed in one of our gardens.
All this to agree with you that music can be healing, even for kids that are just playing a few notes or goofing around on an instrument.
 
I teach science and gardening to elementary school kids, and I always have a toy accordion hanging around for them to fool with when we are gardening. I have an accordion in the classroom as well--you never know when you might need it!
I also managed to get outdoor musical instruments installed in one of our gardens.
All this to agree with you that music can be healing, even for kids that are just playing a few notes or goofing around on an instrument.
Welcome Hummingbird! Great ideas!
 
Hi Gator,

I read Musicophilia many years ago. Very interesting tales of the power of music to affect people.

I played music (guitar and accordion) for many years (6 or 8 ?) at an Alzheimer's support group (as have others on here), and can tell you music therapy with your accordion is super effective in bringing joy to people suffering from this. You won't make much money at it but it is super grarifying if you are into this sort of thing.
I would love to do this eventually.
I'm also intrigued to explore how instrument playing and accordion playing can help cancer survivors with ongoing difficulties and challenges.
On a separate tangent, I also wonder if or how instrument playing and accordion playing might help to address mental health challenges brought on by excessive social media use and gaming.
 
I teach science and gardening to elementary school kids, and I always have a toy accordion hanging around for them to fool with when we are gardening. I have an accordion in the classroom as well--you never know when you might need it!
I also managed to get outdoor musical instruments installed in one of our gardens.
All this to agree with you that music can be healing, even for kids that are just playing a few notes or goofing around on an instrument.
I really love and appreciate you merging the arts and sciences at a young age, and giving experiential learning that the two are not incompatible, and quite the opposite. Not only that, showing, modeling, and giving opportunity in the developmental and formational years of multiple research proven self-care and mental/emotional health improving activities is phenomenal and bound to stick and continue with them in one way or another.
 
I would love to do this eventually.
I'm also intrigued to explore how instrument playing and accordion playing can help cancer survivors with ongoing difficulties and challenges.
On a separate tangent, I also wonder if or how instrument playing and accordion playing might help to address mental health challenges brought on by excessive social media
I would love to do this eventually.
I'm also intrigued to explore how instrument playing and accordion playing can help cancer survivors with ongoing difficulties and challenges.
On a separate tangent, I also wonder if or how instrument playing and accordion playing might help to address mental health challenges brought on by excessive social media use and gaming.

Excellent goals!


I think your second idea has tremendous merit. If a (especially young) person can be persuaded to switch from sociial media to playing for some time I can see great benefit.

Good luck!!!!
 
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I really love and appreciate you merging the arts and sciences at a young age, and giving experiential learning that the two are not incompatible, and quite the opposite. Not only that, showing, modeling, and giving opportunity in the developmental and formational years of multiple research proven self-care and mental/emotional health improving activities is phenomenal and bound to stick and continue with them in one way or another.
The one thing about our school district is that they regard music education as important; lots of music lessons with whatever instrument the student wants to play.
When I was young, I kept fooling around on the neighbor's piano until the neighbor persuaded my parents to get a piano and lessons for me. Having instruments that kids can fool around on is important--you just never know what might catch their interest. And I agree that learning music helps in every area: mental, emotional and educational.
 
I've not read those particular books, but have read others in the field. One in particular I would recommend is "Music; Physician For TImes to Come" - an excellent anthology of writings from the most prominent authors in the field. It has articles from the very technical and theoretical to the practical, case studies, etc.

 
Thank you Cat! The TOC and summary has definitely caught my interest. I'm looking forward to exploring further. Fantastic recommendation. Thank you again
 
Oh, I should mention - this is old material. But it's a good overview on some of the foundational aspects. There should be updated research and theory on the books. My literature review is aged - like me at 63!

Have you seen "In the Garden of Sounds"? A documentary about Swiss (physio) therapist who uses music and sound in his practice working with persons with ASD and other disabilities. I've watched it many times and find it very inspiring. (Wolfgang uses a bit of diatonic accordion in the film, where we can perceive some of the inefficacies of this usage.)

 
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Ah, well age is of course relative. But what I was referring to is the time lapse from my own academic experience and research in the field (music therapy). There will be many discoveries and revelations to come in the field, and I would encourage those with an interest to seek current research. One such source of information is the journal of music therapy, "Voices." https://voices.no//
 
I figure I'm bringing the age average around here down at 67. Younger accordionists are probably all yakking it up on tik tok.
 
I haven't read those three. While discussing books, here’s one which might benefit some, about so-called so-called Tallent vs time invested in practice, in music, sports, whatever:

Talent Is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else​

by Geoff Colvin (Author)


I bought this in an actual paper version years ago.

I’ve ordered the Musicophilia book which sounds interesting - I believe you can’t read too many books!

I remember a manager at sci/tech orgagization where I worked who mentioned he didn’t like to read, had never read through a book in his life. I was astounded. I read dozens a year. My Lovely Bride is an avid reader who keeps notebooks with logs, evaluations, and notes about every book she reads. It’s not uncommon for her to read between 50 or 100 books per year.

JKJ
 
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