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Gluing tabs to aluminum

KLR

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I want to change some of the coupler settings on one of my boxes, the slides for the couplers are made of aluminum and have tabs removed to change what the coupler does; this is a 4 voice box. A machinist friend has offered to make me new slides but Im thinking it would be simpler to just bond on new tabs where needed, if at all possible; Im quite familiar with how impossible it is to solder AL together. I could have new tabs welded/brazed on but again, too much trouble. Is there an adhevise that works particularly well for slapping together AL? Ive researched it a bit but am getting info from enthusiasists of bikes or boats where you have extreme stresses on the parts, Id think a coupler slide wouldnt be under that much stress.

This is a good pic of coupler slides at the FAQ on this site, if anyones puzzled by what Im describing, or simply unfamiliar.

http://www.accordion.co.uk/newfaq/couplers.jpg>couplers.jpg
 

nagant27

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Im not exactly sure I understand why you want to change the settings? This seems like a difficult job. Could you elaborate a little more?
 

JIM D.

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Hi KLR;
Altering shift slides will require the removal of some keys (or teeth) on the slide, and the addition of new keys. In some cases the nylon or brass spacers will have to be varied in thickness. Fortunately for me, in the last 40 years I've been saving old shift slides and shift parts both treble and bass of many makes of accordions and use the parts for alteration. The removal of a tooth is simple but the addition of one is difficult. In most cases when I need a new tooth I can find an old shift slide and remove a portion that will work. when installing a new tooth I drill the new portion and slide and using the heads of small brass braids rivet the replacement tooth in place.
If you have not done this before, and don't have a supply of parts, and damage the slide, you will find your self in a world of trouble, as dealers rarely stock these parts and repair shops that have them will tend to keep them for their own repair stock.
And then there is the matter if changing the nomenclature on the shift face :eek:
 
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tonyg

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KLR,
JimD identifies the real problem with what you propose. Jim points out both the thickness of the slide after riveting the new key in place and the thickness of the spacers. He has a lot of experience with this work and what he's not saying is how much experience, work and judgement goes into getting the final fit so that it works as smoothly as before the change.

Of course, making an entirely new slide as a 'one-off' is a big job.

My question for you is what do you want to accomplish? The accordion in the picture has all the necessary registers. What is the issue?

Tonyg
 

KLR

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Thanks for clueing me in Jim, was hoping you'd reply. I'd been thinking doing this on my own might be taking a bit of a chance. I'll get a quote from my repairman who does exemplary work, I brought this up the last time I visited him and he said he could do it no problem. The accordion in the pic isn't mine, I merely put it up to show what coupler slides look like. I'm not happy with the layout on the LMMH accordion I want worked on, there isn't a solo piccolo setting or organ (LH), and the LMM ("Accordion") setting is at the far right, I'd prefer to have it next to the master in the middle.
 

debra

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KLR said:
Thanks for clueing me in Jim, was hoping youd reply. Id been thinking doing this on my own might be taking a bit of a chance. Ill get a quote from my repairman who does exemplary work, I brought this up the last time I visited him and he said he could do it no problem. The accordion in the pic isnt mine, I merely put it up to show what coupler slides look like. Im not happy with the layout on the LMMH accordion I want worked on, there isnt a solo piccolo setting or organ (LH), and the LMM (Accordion) setting is at the far right, Id prefer to have it next to the master in the middle.
Thats much clearer now. The best thing is to have new slides machined, mainly for reason of solidity and uniform thickness of the slides. Someone with a cnc or a lasercutter should be able to do it. The remaining problem is that of changing the labels on the register switches, or depending on what it really looks like just printing new switches (which can be done on a 3D printer).
Your description is a bit puzzling though. It is quite unusual for an LMMH accordion to not have a single H and an LH register. It sounds like this may have been an LMMM accordion that was later modified to LMMH.
 

KLR

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It is a new accordion, the model is usually LMMM but I asked for LMMH. I was surprised at the layout as it wasn't exactly what I asked for, I don't think I got across what I wanted clearly which is a problem of mine, note. ;) Very nice box otherwise.

The friend I mentioned who could make new ones does work with CNC machines. He said he could make exact copies except for the rectangular cutout sections which would have to have rounded corners, which I don't think would be an insurmountable problem, but I'd rather not take a chance.
 

JerryPH

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Also, do you even have the "H" set of reeds yet? Those would be completely different from the "M" reeds that came with the accordion originally, not something that can be tuned for, that's quite the job to add as well. The reeds are going to have to be removed and replaced. I know it may sound obvious, but sometimes it is something that people would overlook in their haste. :)

Also, you may not even need to make new hardware, just use an existing setting, and add a dot in the right part of the design on the register to identify it on the appropriate register buttons.

Now, I am a complete novice when it comes to repairs, so if I am running out of left field here, my apologies.
 

debra

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KLR said:
It is a new accordion, the model is usually LMMM but I asked for LMMH. I was surprised at the layout as it wasnt exactly what I asked for, I dont think I got across what I wanted clearly which is a problem of mine, note. ;) Very nice box otherwise.

The friend I mentioned who could make new ones does work with CNC machines. He said he could make exact copies except for the rectangular cutout sections which would have to have rounded corners, which I dont think would be an insurmountable problem, but Id rather not take a chance.

Ha! I guessed that right! They converted an LMMM box to LMMH without changing the register possibilities. Adding more registers is not feasible so you will need to make a selection of which registers you really want and which to leave out. (This is even harder a choice than when ordering a new box with chin switches where you have to decide which 5 or so out of about 15 you want to have under the chin.)
 

JerryPH

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So if he wanted more registers, he would need to redesign the entire register mechanism from scratch, or use the current design and make choices as to what registers he wants within the confines of the available design, am I understanding this right?
 

JIM D.

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I'm sorry Jerry, But the answer is no. You see KLR's accordion is a L M M H and the shift machine he has is for a L M M M box. The L M M M shift machine picks the right voice combo's for a L M M M box and when used on a L M M H box WILL NOT pick the right combo's for a L M M H box. The proper solution is to contact the seller and obtain the correct shift machine.
 

KLR

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This model of accordion is usually LMMM but I custom ordered it in LMMH, of course it has the piccolo reeds installed already. This company makes models with H reeds too. Nothing is missing to set it up in the fashion I want, it's just the configuration isn't exactly what I hoped for. I'd ship it back to the manufacturer but they are overseas and the shipping costs are brutal, and I'm wary of taking chances with the accordion being damaged too.
 

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