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DIY re-valving and re-waxing - what can go wrong?

Morne

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Coming from this thread about my Morino.

In case I cannot find somebody who can do a complete overhaul on the inside (if necessary):
Since I want to learn this eventually, whats the worst I can do to it if I attempt re-valving and re-waxing myself? As far as I can tell the tunings pretty good, but if that would have to be changed I would be a little lost. But assuming I dont try to change the tuning, and assuming I dont physically break something, whats there that can go wrong? Would I be able to redo what I mess up? If its only my time Ill waste, thats okay.

Im not completely clumsy and Ive gutted my other accordion before (though thats not rocket science). I just dont have any tools or supplies so Id need to get a hold of that first.
 

JIM D.

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The ???s your asking here are to numerous to answer in one reply. To start with, you will have to go here --
http://www.accordionrevival.com/ACCORDION_REPAIR1.php
In this site are the answers to your ???s. Most of the amateur accordion repair members here have read it and the Pros know it by heart. Once you give this a good read, refer to the chapter here, and there are more than a few members that can give you a more definite answer. Give yourself a bit of time - sit back with a favorite beverage - and give it a read - you will find it informative, interesting and gain some knowledge on accordion repair that in the past most of us had to pay for. :tup:
 

truthinbeer

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I have just found a good waxing video on Youtube. I say good as it only uses the one tool and looks easier to use than the German waxing spoon...though I could be totally wrong. The conversation below the video indicates the tool is a epilating tool, though my search online did not find one. Maybe only available in countries with a tough hair problem. ;)
 

JerryPH

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The couple of videos I saw on youtube ahow someone waxing with the proper melted wax and a small brush that was clipped. Each side was given like 2-3 quick small strokes and done. After seeing that video, I would not be afraid to rewax myself, however I did not see how to revalve (honestly did not look for it), nor how it's done, but it cannot be rocket science difficult.
 

JerryPH

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I found another accordion repair site, not sure how good it is: http://1accordion.net/

If I can also suggest, there was a website I was at a few days ago, but I cannot find it now (its like near 2:00am here as I type this), but the business name is Frank Romano Enterprises and he is located near Boston MA. He had a great assortment of accordion repair tools for sale as well as the proper wax. By a small coincidence, Frank Romano used to live and have his business here in Montreal Quebec, he is the man that sold me my Elka 83 and arrangers all those years ago. :)

I found this on another forum:
FRM Enterprises
10 Festa Rd
Revere, Ma 02151
781-629-1558

Frank Romano owner
frmaccordions.com

His websites seem down, but this link is active:
http://www.frment.com/website/Catalogue_Web/Accessories.pdfs

I hope this offer some kind of trail that could be used to help you out.
 

landro

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The videos tend to demonstrate reed waxing by using an easier bass reed block where the wider space between the plates leave enough room to get a waxing spoon in between. It`s a bit more difficult to do when the treble plates are often 1-2 mm apart.
The videos rarely show them doing it for the first time. It can be an awful mess when wax gets dripped onto the reed when trying to wax in between those tight spaces.
 

truthinbeer

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JIM D. said:
On the ipad, it shows up as a totally blank/dead site.[/quote]

Its all there.

landro said:
The videos tend to demonstrate reed waxing by using an easier bass reed block where the wider space between the plates leave enough room to get a waxing spoon in between. It`s a bit more difficult to do when the treble plates are often 1-2 mm apart.
The videos rarely show them doing it for the first time. It can be an awful mess when wax gets dripped onto the reed when trying to wax in between those tight spaces.

Lol. I can only imagine. In my search for that tool I did come across Batik Tjanting tools which would be ideal for the tiny gaps on treble reed blocks. They look like they are made for the job. There are a number of differing design and all with similar fine to less fine delivery points.
<ATTACHMENT filename=Batik Wax Tjanting Tool.jpg index=0>
 

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JIM D.

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First of all if in any way you are a novice in accordion repair or a pro tech, when only a few reeds or reed replacement is necessary a hot iron is all thats needed. As here --
:tup:

Now when there is little space between the reeds, if you have a good quality wax
you can roll it between your fingers to the size of a thread force it between the reeds and the use an iron.
A good tool for this is a wood burning tool set.---
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...dburning.TRS0&_nkw=wood+burning+tool&_sacat=0

I use one of these --
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wood-Burnin...802512?hash=item4d3df2c690:g:begAAOSwL7VWk6Q3
 

truthinbeer

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Thanks Jim. I had looked at Lester's video but was unsure if he used enough wax with that method. It looked a bit thin to my untrained eye. If you say this is the method and tools to use then that is good enough for me. :tup:

Do you use the spoon method for the base reed blocks?
 

landro

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JIM D. said:
First of all if in any way you are a novice in accordion repair or a pro tech, when only a few reeds or reed replacement is necessary a hot iron is all thats needed. As here --
:tup:

Now when there is little space between the reeds, if you have a good quality wax
you can roll it between your fingers to the size of a thread force it between the reeds and the use an iron.
A good tool for this is a wood burning tool set.---
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...dburning.TRS0&_nkw=wood+burning+tool&_sacat=0

I use one of these --
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wood-Burnin...802512?hash=item4d3df2c690:g:begAAOSwL7VWk6Q3

Those are good videos. In the Lester method video he demonstrates a good steady hand and a coordinated control of both the wax and iron but at 2:10 (in the video) I noticed he did get a drop of wax on the plate next to the leather and maybe even touching the leather. Most of us are not going to be to be as steady or as well practiced . I know that I`m not quite as steady or am I that experienced so I tape off the reed plates with painters blue masking tape , apply the wax , peel off the tape and attach the valves lastly.
It works for me and there`s hardly any cleanup afterwards.
 
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