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DIY Midi Janko Accordion

jjj333

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I plan to build myself such a super-light accordion with a 6 layer Janko keyboard layout. I already converted an old 120-button Farfisa bass part to MIDI. Since I cannot find a fitting, large PC keyboard plate I have to create one from 3 regular PC plates and 123 light-touch, silent Cherry switches.
That will be a bit tricky, for I'll have to cut section out and epoxy-glue it from 3 PC plates. Here's my plan on how to go about:
 

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knobby

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I had to Google what a Janko keyboard was - still not sure I understand it. Sounds a complicated project; please keep us informed with your progress.
 

jjj333

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It took me only some 3-4 weeks to realize my Janko accordion keyboard dream. Of course to turn an old 120-button accordion bass into Midi was far harder, because I didn't want to use the mechanics and so, had to manually wire up all basses and chords. Result:: each button activates only one tiny (gold-silver) contact wire; meaning the buttons are super-light to press. Klaus, the good man from V3 accordion sound modules, sent me a free of charge "v3 accordion master xl" module in return for my whistling samples and so, I together with my project I got my hands onto a great JANKO MiDi accordion... on the cheap! :)
 

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AccordionUprising

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Here a Jankò Accordion from Weltmeister.

FrohlichLogicordeon1.jpg
I had no idea anybody was making Janko keyboards commercially, much less an accordion version! It makes sense. It would be easy to change the reeds (and the colored buttons) to convert a button accordion to Janko. Whereas a piano keyboard maker would require engineering a whole new design. Neat!

If they did this with a Serbian six-row CBA that'd fit the whole Janko layout, yes?
 

Corinto

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I had no idea anybody was making Janko keyboards commercially, much less an accordion version! It makes sense. It would be easy to change the reeds (and the colored buttons) to convert a button accordion to Janko.


Weltmeister Harmona made a batch of about 50 Logicordeons (Jankò) in or before 2011. These accordions aren't on their website today, but they still do have a few of them in stock, and for sale.

German forum with more info = https://www.musiker-board.de/threads/logicordeon-von-harmona.612067/
and here = https://www.musiker-board.de/threads/6-6-knopfakkordeon.333102/
 

jjj333

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These Janko accordions must cost a fortune, because there are only very few available etc., wheras my simple DIY JANKO MIDI accordion costed me only about $100 all up & plus lots of work and that we all can afford. So, DIY is really worth it..
Besides the PC switches I used are far less noisy and far easier to press than the keys on my Tyros. Also, the 120 Bass adds an extra irregular layer of rhythm accents to enrich Yamaha's accompaniment and so, make it less automatic or more natural sounding.
The " V3 accordion sound module" even allows me to create a portable unit, which rivals the terribly expensive Roland accordions.
 
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jjj333

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Here is the free 24 pages pdf introductory tutorial for this 6+6 logicordeon layout accordion. Many pics of grip schemes and chords or scales visualisations :
https://www.yumpu.com/de/document/view/51820154/anleitung-logicordeon-zum-downloaden
Great it's written in German; comes handy, for (50 years ago, I used to be German; i.e. "Made in Ge") - Sadly, it doesn't show fingering. Janko scales have all the same fingering pattern. So, all I would need is a bit of fingering of a major and minor scale. - If it's not available; eventually during months of practicing the Kbd is going to develop the correct fingering.
A big THANK YOU to you good Stephen for this tutorial, as with all new Kbds, practicing this new Kbd turns out to be an nightmare.
It almost feels like learning the accordion the first time. Almost, because some of it is somewhat similar, yet now I have to unlearn old fingering...
This might take considerable efforts, but it will be worth it. -The benefits are obvious.
We shouldn't have learnt that grossly irregular zebra piano layout in the first place! It 's like doctor's or priest's Latin. This is the way Profi musicians tried to distinguish themselves from hobby musicians. Their motto is: ? Why make it easy when it can be made more complicated? - So, let them enjoy their madness and not bother us hobby musicians with it and so, the JANKO Kbd layout offers us just that!
I also invented my own WYSIWYG Janko notation. For that I got help from a graphic forum to graphically convert the Klavarscript (http://klavar.com/en/ ) into my Janko notation. Klavarcript have a freeware App, which converts any MIDI-file to Klavar notation. I wished a programmer creates a program for it to accelerate the conversion process.
 

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Corinto

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For the fingering on a Jankò accordion, my experience is that the recommended fingerings for piano accordion are the best option to start with, as Jankò and PA layout both go up and down for higher and lower notes, ... ymmv.

For notation, imho there are far too many alternative notation systems, see "Source Book of Proposed Music Notation Reforms by Gardner Read" and "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_notation" for examples if interested. Today all publications are with the modern staff notation, and none of the latest alternative notation systems (since Jean-Jacques Rousseau in 1743 till today with Clairnote, Dodeka and hundreds more) can offer more than a few dozens (or up to a few hundreds in one or two cases only) pieces in their new notation system. And all systems claim theirs is the definitve and final system (see= https://www.facebook.com/groups/halalzate). So I feel it is safer to learn and read modern staff notation. It's not that complicated or dificult and well worth the effort, at least is has been in my case, ... of course again ymmv.
 

jjj333

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I prefer using a WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) type of notation, because then I need only to visually transfer the note position. I.e . I visually and physically transfer what I see. Gradually, my eyes and fingers will get used to it. What could be easier?
For the traditional (zebra-) piano already exist such a notation; called https://www.klavarskribo.eu/en/
This notation is far easier to read than conventional notation with # & ♭ and only 5 lines. This conventional notation is as complicated as the zebra piano layout. Professional musicians accept anything for as long they all have a way to perform and musically communicate, but hobby musicians are free to choose easier ways. - I always wanted to create the easiest method to learn and play musical instrument. and I think that's it. Now technology is even able to convert any notation.
 
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D

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If useful for your 6+6 Janko accordion, I have a few more hyperlinks with documents about uniform 6+6 PA keyboard layouts.

Heinrich Josef Vincent (1875): Die Neuklaviatur (The "new" PA layout 6+6, you can find a lot about grip schemes and fingering here):

This person has uploaded some YT videos with a 6+6 uniform keyboard PA accordion:
Säkkijärven polka - Håkan Widar , Uniform Keyboard accordion

You probably already read this article about the history of the 6+6 PA layout:
http://www.le-nouveau-clavier.fr/english/

The earliest mentioning about a whole tone keyboard 6+6 layout was by Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz (1606-1682) around 1654 in Prague.

Patrizio Barbieri: “Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz: Uber die musikalischen Logarithmen” (point 3, pages 153-156 , a sketch of the history of many "inventors" of this 6+6 layout, Barbieri says there are way too many "inventors" to list up in his article, hundreds of persons have claimed to be the inventor in the 19th century of this 6+6 layout).

Barbieri, Patrizio. "Gli ingegnosi cembali e 'violicembali' inventati da Juan Caramuel Lobkowitz per Ferdinando III (c. 1650): notizie inedite dal manoscritto Musica", Comune di Vigevano, Vigevano, 1990, pp. 91-112.

Grip schemes for triads for whole tone keyboards:
http://www.thecipher.com/wholetone-keyboard_triads.html

Gardner Read is a must read for everyone interested in the history of music notation reforms.

About new music notation reforms, here is another recent notation system that tries to simplify music notation, called "Notus":
http://shop.notus.world/en
http://shop.notus.world/en/basics-examples

(I'm sticking to my personal favorite, the numbered music notation by Emile-Joseph-Maurice Chevé, a music key independent notation system, based on relations between notes. Because my CBA accordion also is a key independent equal intervals music instrument. It's a marriage made in heaven. )

If you are looking for reasons why Paul von Janko used a 6 rows keyboard, I'm sure you can find some answers in his 1886 (online !) 68 pages book in German:
Jankó, Paul von. 1886. Eine neue Claviatur. Theorie und Beispiele zur Einführung in die Praxis. Wien: Verlag von Em. Wetzler (Julius Engelmann) (Staatliches Institut für Musikforschung)

Janko has inserted fingerings and grip schemes in his 1886 booklet.
you can read or download it here:
 
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Corinto

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Sincerely I agree a simple easy notation system should be a wonderful tool, and I've seen lots of interesting systems, maybe just too many of them, which is also a problem as they all claim to be the best and final system.

But the most serious problem is that no alternative system has, until today, a nice set of tunebooks for the average hobby musician. Looking at these new systems and their publications webshop (not cheap btw), the available sheet music is almost nothing, nada, cero ... and it doesn't look as this will change in the next future. As a retired average hobby musician, I prefer to use my time to learn and play better and not having to spend time translating modern staff music to another system, and of course ymmv and I respectfully agree all systems may be perfect if it works for you.
 
D

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There is one way to produce sheet music with alternative notations, and that is the use of ICT software. Conversion programs that will convert traditional staff notation into alternative notations.
Artificial intelligence is used in sheet music notation, so it can help with conversion or transcription.

http://musicnotation.org/software/

For 6+6 Janko system players, this music notation is a 6+6 system:

Some music notation programs have conversion tools. So you if you can import the sheet music, you can do automatic conversion.

An informatician or programmer could also develop agorithms to provide automatic (alternative) fingerings on the notated sheet generated by the computer system. But they would have to generate different alternatives for the fingerings, because people want different options and choose what's suits them best.

https://www.researchgate.net/public...tic_Generation_of_Polyphonic_Piano_Fingerings

The reality is complexer than a theoretical model, but AI can be created for piano or accordion fingering learning processes.

All we need is a 12 year Frisco or Beijing ICT whizzkid playing piano or accordion.
The video is in Chinese, but you can follow how imported staff notation sheet music is enriched with a numbered solo top melody line (the 7 numbers refer to the Jianpu or originally the Souhaitty-Rousseau-Chevé French numbered system):
Jianpu in Musescore 2 教程五 - 簡譜

At the end of this YT video you can see the numbers above the staff, those numbers is all I need to play it on my accordion. I just add the bass chord scale degrees in Roman numbers from I to VII

I both use traditional staff music notation and numbered music notation.
The Emile Chevé system in combination with CBA is my lottery ticket to music heaven as a hobby accordionist.
I read it much faster and easier than traditional staff music notation (and I did my 10 years music school learning to read and write trad staff notation. I even took extra classes for the ut clefs they use in cello notation or for conducting orchestras)
 
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