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Dewaxing waxed reed blocks

mikud

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I have little old accordion, but reed blocks (treble and bass) were waxed. I would like to tune them, so I have to dewax them to take them out. Any suggestions? Please see attachment.
 

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Ventura

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dear Mikud,

i am sorry, but the best plan would be to remove the Shoulder Straps
from this accordion, purchase a different accordion that is in better
and usable condition, and put the straps on THAT accordion and play it

your reedblocks appear to be glued on, making the removal and re-waxing almost
impssible to do

the wood of the reedblocks does not look particularly strong to me,
so attempting to remove them may destroy them

and you also need (apparently) all new leathers as well which
is much more expensive than Wax

also note there are metal pins holding the reeds in place as well as wax,
which also need careful removal prior to prying the reeds out of the wax

also, don't mix them up if you do take them out... have a large cardboard
marked to place them on so they stay sorted

good luck
 

debra

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What I would consider first and foremost is whether trying to make anything out of this old bugger is worth your money, time and effort.
If the answer is "yes" then I would suggest to leave the reed blocks in place and see how you can remove (and later rewax) just the reed plates. It looks like then you need to clean the reeds and plates thoroughly after throwing out the old leathers. If and when you succeed in removing all corrosion and get the reeds to be like new and shiny, wax them in and then to about tuning them. It will be a long adventure... Let us know how it goes!
 

JIM D.

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I'm sure you've come to this Forum for the valuable information provided on the use and care of the accordion.
I must appreciate your endeavor to put some life into this old box. As for my advice I'm afraid it will be negative.
The labor involved will be much akin to "Flogging A Dead Horse". Let me give you some reasons for my comment.
Now you can remove the reeds by removing the pins, -- and then a sharp knife blade will have to be used to free
the old reed. Usually done by using a soft wood dowel placed in side the block and pushing the reed out. Of course
it can't be done here as THE REED BLOCKS ARE GLUED IN. Once the reed is out it will have to be tuned on a tuning
table as once the reed is waxed back in the block you will have no access to the inside reed tongue. This accordion
was originally made for a one way trip and with age & wear will have become a candidate for the landfill.
If I've busted your bubble I'm truly sorry.
 

NigelB

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I think we all have one of those atop the closet giving us the side eye.
 

Gonk

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I hate to be a "dry blanket" but I'll bet you could remove the blocks. I'd apply some moisture at the seam, then heat a cranked knife (keep a heat gun running and put the knife under it whenever necessary) and carefully work it in between the fondo and the blocks. More drops of moisture as needed. It will take time and maybe more than one session, but you should be able to get it off. Slow is best; you don't want to scar the fondo. When they are off, you can make normal mounts and gaskets for them.
 

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