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Decent 60-bass PA?

jozz

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Searching for a really light compact box, for the occasion that my 32-bass is too limiting and my 3-choir 72 too heavy.
Preferably MM, of decent brand, with good internals and reeds.
 
True, but I find I can potentially stay under 6kg with a 26/60. Not so much with a 72, that mostly have 3-choir and over 6.5kg

Been looking at the Delicia Junior 23 or 24, where the 23 interestingly is a 26/72 3-choir, around 6.5kg.
 
Hohner is more elegant in details than Weltmeister but they make it more Hohnerish every day. Both are basically the same accordions.
 
 
The Delicia junior is a well made instrument, and is available with different grades of reeds as a option.
If you want a bit smaller and lighter ,the Weltmeister Rubin would be your best option. It does have narrower keys (18mm) but due to this you get a 30 key heyboard.
The Bravo would be my last choice since every one I get has to have about an hour or two of shop time spent gapping the reeds and doing spot tuning to bring it up to the performance of the first two instruments. They seem to be fine once this is done.
 
The Delicia junior is a well made instrument, and is available with different grades of reeds as a option.
If you want a bit smaller and lighter ,the Weltmeister Rubin would be your best option. It does have narrower keys (18mm) but due to this you get a 30 key heyboard.
The Bravo would be my last choice since every one I get has to have about an hour or two of shop time spent gapping the reeds and doing spot tuning to bring it up to the performance of the first two instruments. They seem to be fine once this is done.
thanks for this info

do you have any insight into quality of the Delicia's throughout the years?
I've been looking into the Junior and noticed a lot of cosmetic differences (grille, register buttons etc.). They are still available new at the factory it seems - how would these new compare to older ones in the second hand market?
 
The modern grills are different, but the older Soviet era instruments look a lot different. Quality on the old ones is generally good but the wax is often hard as hell and brittle.
 
This size is indeed likely the best, the thing that would concern me is the newer Bravo models are Asian made, my uncle bought a new one, and it was horrible. Sticking keys and registers, lots of notes out of tune, insides the keys, and mechanics were made from plastic. Maybe saying it was horrible was being kind. I tested it out and besides all the issues, it felt more like a toy than a useable instrument.

He ended up returning it and found a 60’s model for 1/3rd the price that was 3 times better and sounded great.
 
I'll be perusing the Delicia factory in September just for fun so at least I may get some more real life experience with them, even if its a small amount.
 
I'm a believer in trying to answer an OP question without attempts at pushing people to do something different from what they asked about.

I'm with you, OP--I will use 72-bass and will also use 48-bass, but 60 is perfect when one wants to go light. It gives you chords for all scale notes while being a smidge lighter than a 72-bass in a way can indeed make a difference.

Will we assume you are talking about a box with 26 treble keys? Asking because you mention your 32-bass, and those are not all 26 treble. But assuming you do mean 26, yes, there are 26/60 MMs out there. The caveat is that if by "decent brand" and "good internals and reeds" you mean Italian-made or the old West German Hohners . . . the West German Hohners didn't come in that configuration, and Italian will cost you. Inflation on prices for new Italian accordions has skyrocketed. I have never seen a vintage Italian 26-key in a 60-bass configuration.

Here are some Italian companies that make MM 26/60s. Well, I should say, up until the pandemic. It's unclear what kind of output has been going on since then. The smaller sizes don't seem to be appearing in dealer inventories the last couple of years--Current new output seems to be emphasizing the big models they can charge big money for. I can't tell whether the constriction is permanent or will pass. Anyhow:

These accordions are all over 3,000 euro in price.

Serenellini makes a 26/60 MM, usually they are the wood-chassis models. I think with hand reeds.
Beltuna makes a 26/60 MM, they usually are the French-polished the stained/painted wood finishes, but I've seen black too.
Bugari makes a 26/60 MM but you may have to order it because the 26-keys that appear in dealer stocks are usually 48. But they do make 60.


-----For example, here is a Serenellini 26 60--the first is in black. The second is the wood-chassis "Teddy" model, which I've seen in 26/60 and 26/48. The Serenellini would probably be an order, I don't see any in stock anywhere:




-----Here is a Beltuna 26/60 listed by a store in France--priced at nearly 3700 euro--not in stock, listed as a special order. If you order one, order it specifying without the "arty" paint job or solvent on the bellows. I have one purchased five years ago from a US dealer at a price lower than this, and the fumes coming off the bellows are still ghastly, front and back. Maybe it's glue, but whatever it is should be banned on health grounds. The sound and response of the reeds is wonderful, but it's sitting in the case until I can have the bellows replaced:



-----There is also of course the eye-wateringly expensive 60-bass MM 34-key Saltarelle Clifden:







-----OTOH, there are Hohner Bravo 26/60 models available out there in red or in black at much lower prices. It's not uncommon to need to take your brand-new Bravo to your local tech for fine-tuning adjustment or reed voicing/reed gapping adjustment fresh out of the box. (News Flash: This is also true of brand-new Italian accordions.) After some years the springs operating the bass buttons and piano keys in the Hohner Bravos can tend to wear out, but springs can be replaced. I'm leery of the big models with more reed banks, buttons, and switches, but I've found the little MMs to be responsive, playable instruments that can serve you well for folk music.


-----If you get on with the slimmer keys, there is also the MM Weltmeister Rubin 60-bass model with 30 treble. Chassis dimensions and weight are the same as a 26-key. A unique and delightful option provided you don't mind slimmer keys. Welt is another cheaper brand whose small MM models I have historically liked for folk music--that is, at a certain price point. The prices of these are getting up there in a way I find dismaying given they have plastic reedblocks and a plastic bass mechanism. Sadly, post-pandemic inflation of accordion prices seems to be the way of things across the board. Here is an example from a Thomann listing--I'd go with a reputable individual dealer, but this is as an example:

 
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I'm a believer in trying to answer an OP question without attempts at pushing people to do something different from what they asked about.

Bravo!

(People do that in all sort of situations. Last week I went to my local optician armed with a new prescription. I said that I wanted bifocals. The person behind the counter went into "progressives are better" mode, and wanted to debate my request. I just left.)
 
Hohner is more elegant in details than Weltmeister but they make it more Hohnerish every day. Both are basically the same accordions.
Not the same at all if you work on them. I pretty much stopped carrying Hohners (bravo) since I got tired of having to do a total tuning on a brand new instrument at my expense. Warranty is completely different too. Good luck getting parts and expect to pay a lot for them in the US. Hohner quoted me $425 wholesale for a set of replacement bellows (72 bass Bravo) and it would take 6 months to get them. Had someone I know in Germany take take a shipment and rebox them and it still cost me only half after paying German retail and VAT.
The Rubin is the lightest and most compact instrument and is about 20% smaller in total size than the 48 bass Bravo. I have had the Rubin made with hand finished reeds , but the Rubin uses a smaller reed plate than the standard Italian accordion and these reeds are not always available.
The Delicia 26/72 LMM is bigger but is a really nice handling instrument. Also available with four grades of reeds from Special to Hand made.
 
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