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corroded bass mech

Bontiki

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hello there,
the chord buttons on this 24 bass box felt stiff and rough when pushed and on inspection the metal parts look corroded.
Ive searched couple posts and sanding the bits that move other bits connected to the pallets seems to be the way forward? maybe? should I clean and sand all parts that look corroded ? the rods with buttons on the end that slide thru the wooden slots rise up a bit and rub against the underside on the aluminum strip. I was thinking that the spring tension may contribute to why its stiff ? I'll service the pallets and could replace ,or if there's a way to, adjust the springs . I have a Couple of 60's Hohner Boxs and both have easier actions than this 50's Serenelli . I realise its a cheap italian box and I could be over thinking things .
any info greatly appreciated .
Cheers
Roy
 

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debra

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You could indeed disassemble everything and then sand each part to remove the zinc-oxide from the rods of the "catorcetti". The catorcetti are made of zinc-plated (anodized?) steel and that zinc outer layer is corroded and therefore occupies a bit more space and causes the mechanism to fail. Of course this corrosion is a sign of the instrument having been stored and/or used in a moist environment so the reeds might also be affected... Such old instruments are generally not worth repairing. They can survive for a century but only when stored and used in a more friendly (dry) environment.
 

WaldoW

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I have had success with exercising all the buttons repeatedly to wear off the oxide deposits. The mechanism loosened up over time.
Paul: Plating is the correct term; the deposition of a metal over another metal via electrolysis (as in nickel plating). The term anodizing is reserved for the controlled oxidization of a metal surface, wherein the oxide penetrates the metal surface, forming a hard protective layer (aluminum and titanium come to mind). Aluminum can be plated as well (as in chrome plated).
It's a shame they used zinc as cadmium would have been a better choice, and cheaper as well.

Press on,
Waldo
 

Dingo40

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WaldoW,
"It's a shame they used zinc as cadmium would have been a better choice, and cheaper as well"
But:
"Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal and is considered to be an environmental pollutant. Cadmium levels in the environment vary widely. Several sources of human exposure to Cd, including employment in primary metal industries, production of certain batteries, foods, soil and cigarette smoke, are known.2 Feb 2016"
And:
"Cadmium can accumulate in liver, kidneys and bones, which may serve as sources of exposure later in life. In the environment, cadmium is toxic to plants, animals and micro-organisms. Being a simple chemical element, cadmium is persistent – it cannot be broken down into less toxic substances in the environment.10 Jan 2015"
 
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WaldoW

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Dingo,
Should have completed the material name: Cad Iridate plating
 

JIM D.

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From the picture you provided I have a suggestion for you that just might save you some disassembly.

First of all obtain a dry lube spray product. Now I'm not sure of the products available to you in Australia but we have
members there that will suggest the product for sale in your country. ( Dingo are you reading this ?? )
Now all of the dry lube sprays work in the same fashion. They go on wet and rapidly dry to a lubricating film.
(1st) without depressing the buttons, spray the metal components of the bass machine then depress the buttons
rapidly as the lube dries.

(2nd) rapidly depressing the buttons should reduce the friction and improve the spring function.

(3rd) repeat the process if necessary.

If your bass springs are fine the result should bring the bass machine action back to originality.
And not to worry about the remaining dry lube coating remaining as it will deter any future rust and
oxidation.
 

Tom

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From the picture you provided I have a suggestion for you that just might save you some disassembly.

First of all obtain a dry lube spray product. Now I'm not sure of the products available to you in Australia but we have
members there that will suggest the product for sale in your country. ( Dingo are you reading this ?? )
Now all of the dry lube sprays work in the same fashion. They go on wet and rapidly dry to a lubricating film.
(1st) without depressing the buttons, spray the metal components of the bass machine then depress the buttons
rapidly as the lube dries.

(2nd) rapidly depressing the buttons should reduce the friction and improve the spring function.

(3rd) repeat the process if necessary.

If your bass springs are fine the result should bring the bass machine action back to originality.
And not to worry about the remaining dry lube coating remaining as it will deter any future rust and
oxidation.
Good to know there is something we can spray on the bass mechanusm. Thanks.
 

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