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chinese stella a good beginner accordion?

A

accordian

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when I first started I payed 97 for an
accordion 12 bass which although
isn't alot for an instrument it's still
12 bass and incredibly limited
or at least I found that to be the case
although these stella accordions
are bad I own one and I would say
that for 40 as iv'e seen them on
ebay they aren't too bad and have
minors , majors , 7ths. and gives alot
more options.

however the only problem I came across
was one key was slightly out of tune but
didn't render it unusable.

your thoughts?
 
L

lightninboy

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Obviously a first accordion doesn't have to be first-class because maybe over half the players never get advanced far enough to need better.

But you're rather advanced, I'm guessing.
 

Stephen Hawkins

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I know nothing about Stella accordions. In fact, I can't ever remember hearing about them.

If we can broaden the debate to include all Chinese made accordions, I think it is possible to get a general feel for the subject.

I suppose it would be helpful if we were to divide Chinese made accordions into two separate groups. Those that are Chinese designed and manufactured, and those with some European connection or influence.

The European designed models are probably better than the wholly Chinese designed instruments, though I have read accounts which question this assertion.

There seems little doubt that the Chinese have made vast improvements to their accordions, though I am aware that some of their instruments are of very poor quality. "Golden Cup" appears to have a very ropey reputation, for instance.

As my recent thread reveals, E.SOPRANI "Circus Model" accordions are now made in China, and nobody could really say that they are a bad instrument.

It really boils down to a number of personal considerations, not least of which is the use to which the instrument is put. A Chanson or Pearl River is perfectly acceptable at a Folk Club, but you may want something better if you are playing at the Royal Albert Hall. Cost is another important consideration for many people, which is brought into sharp focus when comparing the prices of European & Chinese instruments. Comparable Chinese accordions often cost less than half the price of a European model.

I recognise the difference in quality between European & Chinese instruments, but I also recognise the fact that not everyone wants or needs a top quality machine. For those of us who play in mundane venues, I truly believe that there is a place for Chinese instruments.

Stephen.
 
L

lightninboy

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Yeah, if a Stella works out for you, you might as well use it, you can always upgrade when you get more advanced.
 

Happy girl

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For me, the emphasis is not where the instrument comes from or its name tag, but the sound it emanates.

My ladies model Sonola was in fine condition, &, as a bonus, lightweight, but, I didn’t get pleasure from listening to it, so it had to go.

I say, ‘Don’t judge a book by its cover;’ just play your Stella, or Chanson, or whatever, & if it is pleasing to your ears, enjoy!
 

george garside

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I have often said to those buying a first box that the sound it makes is probably the most important factor ,within of course an individuals price range' Buy that bargain 'superior' box that you don't quite like the sound of but think you can get used to is usually a big mistake as their will be little or no pleasure in slogging through hours of initial practice and the thing will finish up on top of the wardrobe never to be seen again.
A , maybe, less posh, lower quality box that you love the sound of will be a pleasure to practice on and for some will be all they ever need and for others will enable them to make a better choice if they want to upgrade.
My first box, 60 years ago was a 3row 12 bass hohner that sounded great then and still does! I have bought and sold many boxes over the years but still have that hohner and still play it regularly as I just love the sound of it . The action no great shakes but OK. The reed quality middle of the road. The free percussion from the pallets and mechanism adds a bit to the rhythm but can be a pain if playing legato.
But the sound - I love it and that's all that matters unless you intend to play in a conservatory instead of the garden shed!

george ;) :evil:
 
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accordian

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george garside post_id=56752 time=1522663788 user_id=118 said:
I have often said to those buying a first box that the sound it makes is probably the most important factor ,within of course an individuals price range Buy that bargain superior box that you dont quite like the sound of but think you can get used to is usually a big mistake as their will be little or no pleasure in slogging through hours of initial practice and the thing will finish up on top of the wardrobe never to be seen again.
A , maybe, less posh, lower quality box that you love the sound of will be a pleasure to practice on and for some will be all they ever need and for others will enable them to make a better choice if they want to upgrade.
My first box, 60 years ago was a 3row 12 bass hohner that sounded great then and still does! I have bought and sold many boxes over the years but still have that hohner and still play it regularly as I just love the sound of it . The action no great shakes but OK. The reed quality middle of the road. The free percussion from the pallets and mechanism adds a bit to the rhythm but can be a pain if playing legato.
But the sound - I love it and thats all that matters unless you intend to play in a conservatory instead of the garden shed!

george ;) :evil:

I wish I hadve kept mine
nothing special a 12 bass firotti
but it was still my first accodion
and sold it and bought my 111 bass
you see in my vids but at the same
time I wish I had kinda kept that one
 

jozz

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:cry: my first accordion was stolen

(well it was a Parrot so no biggie)

It could have been in the same league as these Stella's, but to me it felt right.

It's still your first, the one that got away...

:ch
 

Anyanka

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My first accordion was a Stella 48 bass, bought second-hand via ebay (but I tried it before buying). It did the job, i.e. I used it for a few weeks to make sure that I could learn to play an accordion. However, the sound was awful and the quality of the box was very poor - clacky keys, a shoddy casing, pins that worked themselves loose every five minutes. I moved on to a second-hand 120-bass Galotta which gave me tennis elbow but sounded much much better. Sold the Stella and even made a small profit, so no regrets.
 

Jiri

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I have bought, just from interest, second-hand Parrot. Accordion was optically nice, but the sound was not very good and bass part was exchanged with any Hohner. But, the worst thing of this accordion, was horrible smell ! It was not possible clear away, even after hours on the wind (especially separated bellow).
Later I have found in one music shop new one Parrot, I tested it a little and the quality of the sound was not better, especially bass part (probably reason, why it was exchanged on my Parrot), but it was without smell.
And last time I met Chinese accordion with different name in another serious musicshop, but I don't remember the name of this product, something with ..star.. in the name. The price was e.g. one third of European accordion, but the mechanics and tone response were very poor. The salesperson said that it is just for beginners, but to be honest, in case to be beginner and use this accordion, I probably definitelly stop learning ... . For the same price it is possible to buy e.g. used Czech made Delicia accordion in perfect condition, or older Weltmeister or Hohner ... .
So this is my subjective opinion :).
Jiri
 

george garside

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The problem with older Chinese boxes is/was a lack of quality control eg there might be one really decent one in 6!. Some importers opened them up and 'fettled' them, gaining worthwhile improvement.
However the quality control on current Chinese boxes seems to have improved somewhat but again if buying new try everyone the shop has in stock!

There are also Chinese made boxes made for and branded by retailers /wholesalers which have Italian reeds and decent quality control eg the Stephanelli imported to uk by Klinkscale accordions and of course the Chinese made hohners.but

Again some of the older soviet block east European boxes were not particularly good but those makes are now hugely improved with access to decent reed steel etc etc

george
 

Anyanka

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Jiri post_id=56799 time=1522835958 user_id=2752 said:
[...] to be honest, in case to be beginner and use this accordion, I probably definitelly stop learning ... . For the same price it is possible to buy e.g. used Czech made Delicia accordion in perfect condition, or older Weltmeister or Hohner ... [...]

Thats a very good point!

My second accordion, the Galotta (mass produced in pre-unification East Germany), needed so much strength to play it that it slowed down my progress: something I did not realise until I joined the No.1 Ladies Accordion Orchestra, where my new bandmates let me try their Italian accordions. It was a revelation, and I immediately went looking for a second-hand Pigini.
 

TomBR

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The essence seems to be, if you enjoy it, play it. If you don't enjoy it then ask whether the problem is you or the instrument!
Trouble is, unsupported beginners may never find out that the instrument was the problem.

Then again, as a beginner, you don't know what you really want, or will want in a couple of years time.
It's a good reason to buy from a dealer who'll give a good deal when you part exchange an instrument you bought from them.
 

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