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Can you identify this newbie's Hohner?

ccaissie

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Suddenly want to begin Cajun-type honking and tooting. I had learned as a kid on a large full Galanti box, which I still have, but played a small piano type in a Morris Dance group in Alaska.
Warning....do not play accordion in a bar.....Alaskan women think it's fun to sneak up and goose you while both hands are busy on the keys.

If you have particulars on this vintage and style of this C/F Hohner, please inform me. Since I have played Blues Harp Harmonica, the keys and push-pull are quite familiar.

Also, there is some blockage of one reed so I will pull it apart for cleaning. I am interested in changing the temper from the Standard tuning to more Cajun type intonation. Since I'm a telescope maker and have instrument repair skills, I think this is do-able. Whadda you think, bro?
 

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TomBR

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Hi ccaissie
melodeon.net is the place as Paul said.
Your box looks very much like an early Hohner "Double Ray" apart from not being labelled as such.
Good luck with your project.
I'd be astonished if it wasn't two sets of reeds on the treble end. You're only going to get part way to a Cajun-ish sound as that would normally be four sets of reeds.
Cheers
Tom
 

Gonk

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As for identification, these didn't have names, but what's interesting to me is the absence of Stradella corners (the metal trim pieces on the rounded corners). That suggests to me that this was a transitional or experimental design from the mid to late '30s - and one which didn't last long. When the Stradella corners disappeared from the celluloid covered models, like the Erica or Double-Ray, the design got less boxy and the top of the grill was curved, and in short order the body became curved at that point as well.

The design of yours is otherwise identical to the early celluloid-covered models that later became the ubiquitous 2915 / 2815, often called a "pokerwork" due to the most famous variant being decorated in gold on black. I'm guessing the fingerboard mechanics are metal, and it has steel reeds? The "christmas tree" grill is less common on these and seen more often on the early club models and 3-voice boxes. Mike Rowbotham has posted a picture / sound clip of a box also from a brief transitional period, the "pre-Erica:"


Frankly, I've never seen a flat grill combined with rounded all-celluloid corners. I'll be watching with interest if you post it over at melodeon.net.
 

craigd

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Suddenly want to begin Cajun-type honking and tooting. I had learned as a kid on a large full Galanti box, which I still have, but played a small piano type in a Morris Dance group in Alaska.
Warning....do not play accordion in a bar.....Alaskan women think it's fun to sneak up and goose you while both hands are busy on the keys.

If you have particulars on this vintage and style of this C/F Hohner, please inform me. Since I have played Blues Harp Harmonica, the keys and push-pull are quite familiar.

Also, there is some blockage of one reed so I will pull it apart for cleaning. I am interested in changing the temper from the Standard tuning to more Cajun type intonation. Since I'm a telescope maker and have instrument repair skills, I think this is do-able. Whadda you think, bro?
Hello and welcome to the forum. I must say though, that I was a bit taken aback by the use of "whadda" and especially "bro" right out of the gate. Also, I believe this is the first time I have seen reference to "goosing" here on the forum. Or Alaskan women for that matter. But I don't mean to nitpick, and I'm sure those referring you to melodeon.net were not suggesting you and your melodeon would not be embraced here.
 

ccaissie

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As for identification, these didn't have names, but what's interesting to me is the absence of Stradella corners (the metal trim pieces on the rounded corners). That suggests to me that this was a transitional or experimental design from the mid to late '30s - and one which didn't last long. When the Stradella corners disappeared from the celluloid covered models, like the Erica or Double-Ray, the design got less boxy and the top of the grill was curved, and in short order the body became curved at that point as well.

The design of yours is otherwise identical to the early celluloid-covered models that later became the ubiquitous 2915 / 2815, often called a "pokerwork" due to the most famous variant being decorated in gold on black. I'm guessing the fingerboard mechanics are metal, and it has steel reeds? The "christmas tree" grill is less common on these and seen more often on the early club models and 3-voice boxes. Mike Rowbotham has posted a picture / sound clip of a box also from a brief transitional period, the "pre-Erica:"


Frankly, I've never seen a flat grill combined with rounded all-celluloid corners. I'll be watching with interest if you post it over at melodeon.net.
Correct, it has "steel reeds" as stated on a top plate. Thanks for the sound clip...I'm encouraged, and the pic is representative of the unit I have. The celluloid gives it a definite 1930's kitchen look. I have also posted in melodeon.net for the diatonic input.

Thanks, All.
 

ccaissie

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Hello and welcome to the forum. I must say though, that I was a bit taken aback by the use of "whadda" and especially "bro" right out of the gate. Also, I believe this is the first time I have seen reference to "goosing" here on the forum. Or Alaskan women for that matter. But I don't mean to nitpick, and I'm sure those referring you to melodeon.net were not suggesting you and your melodeon would not be embraced here.
My family is from New Brunswick, 1600's immigrants who later hid from the British during the Diaspora to Louisiana. When I worked down in the oil patch in coastal LA, I was reunited with Acadian/'Cadian/Cadjun roots, and certainly picked up the slang. Apologies if my accordion playing story made you blush.

Thanks for the replies.
 

Tom

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My family is from New Brunswick, 1600's immigrants who later hid from the British during the Diaspora to Louisiana. When I worked down in the oil patch in coastal LA, I was reunited with Acadian/'Cadian/Cadjun roots, and certainly picked up the slang. Apologies if my accordion playing story made you blush.

Thanks for the replies.
I think that it will be difficult, but not impossible to change the overall sound on a box with reeds that old. I think you would be better served leaving it the way it is, maybe restoring as in spot tuning and leathers replacement, and buying a real Cajun box, like they are making now in Louisiana, etc, or even a new Hohner.

I liked your story, good luck, let the bontemps roulette!
 

ccaissie

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All good advice...yes, there's a certain appreciation for leaving some things as original, and making a different effort.
 

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