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BON Artz try-out

jozz

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here is some raw footage of this thing we are currently developing for this summer season

decent promo to follow


:ch
 
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maugein96

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Hi jozz,

Some of we older guys probably tend to forget that the accordion is being used in modern types of music, and that is a very good thing for the instrument. (I am making the assumption that what you do is "modern").

A lot of us pick up the box and take ourselves back, up to 100 years or even more, with once popular tunes our grandparents knew better than we do. That simply translates as a slow and painful death for the accordion with the passing of generations.

Before I joined the forum a few years ago I had absolutely no concept of the accordion being used for anything other than "old fashioned" popular music styles. I was also amazed that so many people play classical music on the accordion, something I was totally ignorant of. Well, I knew that it had been done, but just assumed that it had died out. Other than on You Tube and other social media, I have never seen or heard anybody play classical music on the box, but I don't really get out much, and live in a fairly rural and isolated part of the country (it's OK, I've only got 5 fingers on each hand!). I've since discovered that a significant number of forum members are mainly interested in classical music, or are at least keen to incorporate it into their repertoires.

Whilst I'll probably never quite be able to get "into" what you're doing, you certainly do it very well, and I wish you every success with your venture.

Keep playing your accordion in whatever style. Castelfidardo needs you!
 

jozz

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maugein96 post_id=59880 time=1528449288 user_id=607 said:
Some of we older guys probably tend to forget that the accordion is being used in modern types of music, and that is a very good thing for the instrument. (I am making the assumption that what you do is modern).

well modern....the intended audience is 55+ :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

thats where the demand is nowadays
 
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Geronimo

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maugein96 post_id=59880 time=1528449288 user_id=607 said:
Hi jozz,

Some of we older guys probably tend to forget that the accordion is being used in modern types of music, and that is a very good thing for the instrument. (I am making the assumption that what you do is modern).
Uh, you listened to the sampler? Seemed just like rather standard folksy style ensemble music to me. Basically music for conveying a message rather than just itself, and the accordion being used in one of its core capacities. Not groundbreaking experimental music or classical music or established traditionals, just using the accordion for something its good at.
A lot of us pick up the box and take ourselves back, up to 100 years or even more, with once popular tunes our grandparents knew better than we do. That simply translates as a slow and painful death for the accordion with the passing of generations.
You mean, like Bach killed the organ and Chopin the piano? I consider it unlikely to see the time where more hurdygurdies are being played than accordions. Accordion musette music is actually a stylized offspin of the original folk musette that used bagpipes: accordions hijacked that genre in order to showcase accordions. In this kind of repurposed genre, the popularity may be vascillating more than in less streamlined forms. Musette is just one facet of what happened mainly about a hundred years ago when the accordion ventured into a lot of new areas after the chromatic accordion was popularized over the more musically confined diatonic bisonoric instruments. Some of those areas have lost a lot of their appeal since then, others didnt.

There still is a lot of accordion solo acts around, more often than not instrumental (namely without singing). The attractivity seems to beat hurdygurdy... More relevantly, I see more instrumental solos in the street using accordion than guitar, even though the guitar quite dominates self-accompanied singing.
 
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maugein96

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jozz post_id=59881 time=1528451824 user_id=2600 said:
maugein96 post_id=59880 time=1528449288 user_id=607 said:
Some of we older guys probably tend to forget that the accordion is being used in modern types of music, and that is a very good thing for the instrument. (I am making the assumption that what you do is modern).

well modern....the intended audience is 55+ :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

thats where the demand is nowadays

Sorry, I work on the principle that 55+ is modern! Anybody born after 1960 is still a kid in my world. Also, my knowledge of accordion styles is so narrow it would fit through the eye of a needle, so it looks like I misinterpreted yet another video clip.

Suffice to say I liked what you played, even although I hadnt the first idea what it was.
 
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maugein96

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Geronimo post_id=59887 time=1528456230 user_id=2623 said:
You mean, like Bach killed the organ and Chopin the piano? I consider it unlikely to see the time where more hurdygurdies are being played than accordions. Accordion musette music is actually a stylized offspin of the original folk musette that used bagpipes: accordions hijacked that genre in order to showcase accordions. In this kind of repurposed genre, the popularity may be vascillating more than in less streamlined forms. Musette is just one facet of what happened mainly about a hundred years ago when the accordion ventured into a lot of new areas after the chromatic accordion was popularized over the more musically confined diatonic bisonoric instruments. Some of those areas have lost a lot of their appeal since then, others didnt.

There still is a lot of accordion solo acts around, more often than not instrumental (namely without singing). The attractivity seems to beat hurdygurdy... More relevantly, I see more instrumental solos in the street using accordion than guitar, even though the guitar quite dominates self-accompanied singing.

Geronimo,

They must have killed off quite a few organs and pianos, as I havent seen many of those in recent years, although I can remember a time when they were relatively popular features in ordinary households here in the UK.

My own enjoyment of the accordion is confined to relatively simple easy listening material, although I appreciate I may be in a minority there (at least on the forum). Heavy theoretical stuff just confuses me, and I try and concentrate on light hearted discussion, as that is the limit of my capabilities. I have no real knowledge of musical history or trends, so cannot hope to engage in meaningful discussions which are well above my level of comprehension. I did try to highlight that before in a previous post.

As far as I can ascertain the issue appears to be that I made mention of the fact that the accordion is less popular than it was in former times. If that is not in fact the case, then Id better start looking in the cellar, in case I find an organ or a piano that somebody might have removed from the living room, and return it to its proper place. My wife better start serving meals in the cellar if I do find one or the other, and if I find both well be sleeping in the cellar as well!
 
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maugein96

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losthobos post_id=59890 time=1528458388 user_id=729 said:

Terry,

They stopped recruiting Spanish firefighters up here in Scotland, as every time they were just about to catch people jumping off tall buildings in those big nets and canvas lined hoops, they would shout ole! and sidestep the jumper!

Time I started wising up on whats happening in the accordion world, before I start fiddling with the laptop keyboard, as Im struggling with all those big words that most of we Scots types have never seen before.

Wha kikt thon lang grey bick? Pit yur hauns up fur the tawse ya wee nyaff? I mean thats about the limit of my English, and it appears its just not enough!
 
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maugein96

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"Thocht simdae micht hae taed mah girrs fur thon hin'maist post abune this ane?"

If nobody can understand this then I'm glad, as I won't have any fear of being taken to task for not getting it right!

Sorry, jozz. This is not about your clip or reply to my post.

It's just that I often have trouble understanding some of the highbrow English vocabulary used by some forum members, so I thought I may as well post in language I knew the absolute meaning of, so that nobody had any cause to challenge me on its accuracy, or whether it was appropriate to a particular topic. I do have an Oxford English dictionary somewhere, but I've never had much cause to use it during the last 65 years or so.

FWIW the gobbledegook I've posted is actually in Lallans, a recognised Lowland Scottish dialect of English. I can't translate it or I'll be booted off the forum. Mind you, sometimes that would seem to be an attractive proposition, as my blood pressure might be a bit better for it.

Somebody once told me the accordion was a good way of relaxing and having fun. He obviously hadn't read some of the posts on this forum!

P.S. Don't pass my toys back into the pram, as I'll just throw them out again!

:hb
 
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Geronimo

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maugein96 post_id=59914 time=1528493974 user_id=607 said:
Its just that I often have trouble understanding some of the highbrow English vocabulary used by some forum members,
Well, for better or worse English is todays Latin. People use it to communicate even when it has at best a tenuous connection to their native language.

So its to be expected that you get a wide range from people writing almost incomprehensible gibberish to people like myself where you are hard put to figure how they manage to be talking out of what must be blocked by a huge stick. Id be hard put to blame what would amount to the German education system for my somewhat particular choice of words, but in some manner you get a bit of reflection of the respective education system priorities regarding foreign language education in how non-native speakers tend to communicate.
maugein96 post_id=59894 time=1528467728 user_id=607 said:
They must have killed off quite a few organs and pianos, as I havent seen many of those in recent years, although I can remember a time when they were relatively popular features in ordinary households here in the UK.
There are few ordinary households where I am still being admitted and I would be somewhat loth to blame the envy of practising musicians over my chosen instrument for this. So I have to take your word for it.
 
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maugein96

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Geronimo,

It is well enough documented that the English language is one of the most indirect and ambiguous in the world. There are just too many ways of attempting to say the same thing, and it all gets very complicated, especially when non-native speakers are forced to use it as a "lingua franca" in the manner of the "Latin" you mention.

Latin and French were forced on the more able school pupils of my generation here in Scotland. Latin, because of the influence it has on English, and French because of historical connections between France and Scotland, when Scotland was independent from England (just before I was born!)

Even here in the UK, English often fails to achieve the desired result of enabling us all to communicate accurately with each other, as dialects typically change every few miles, and that causes endless problems.

Our primary school teachers once taught us in the Lallans dialect I made use of in my recent posts, as they believed it was beneficial to us to use everyday speech in the classroom. However, the powers that be in Edinburgh, where the dialect is very much nearer to standard English, decided (probably correctly) that Lallans was dying out and we suddenly resumed tuition in "English". No matter how hard a Scottish person tries to speak English, very few of us are able to cope with standard English pronunciation, as the vowel sounds are all but impossible for us, and we habitually use a glottal stop, like the Danes have.

The end result of all that is most of we Scots tend to have a fairly limited English vocabulary, with such words like "repurposed" and "vascillating" conveying absolutely no meaning at all to the vast majority of us. Those elite few Scots who have had the privilege to have been educated to a level consistent with equally privileged positions in society may be able to get the gist of things, but to the average Scot such vocabulary is pretty alien.

The German education system is uncharted territory for me, and may well be the reason why certain difficulties exist when any attempt is made to translate from one language to the other. The fact that there is no alternative translation from German into English that will be understood by Scottish people is not your fault, and maybe there should be a Latin forum for accordionists. It probably wouldn't be that much more difficult for us if we all put our minds to it.

I know that my attempts at humour sometimes appear off the wall, and are probably inappropriate in some situations. However, you do have a tendency to appear aggressive at times, even if that is not your intention. If it is a matter of translation then I do believe you have explained that in your last post, and I certainly wouldn't fancy having to communicate in any "lingua franca" other than English, even if I'm not very adept in its use.

The fact that most of we UK types are monolingual and arrogant about it is another factor that causes problems, but we may have to look across the Atlantic for a suitable excuse for that.

I would wager that most English people would also struggle to cope with some of the vocabulary I've mentioned, but I'd best leave that for them to answer.

As my Irish grandfather would have said "Education is a great thing, if you can spell it!"
 

losthobos

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Just thought id mention i play the old tunes to keep them alive rather than keep the accordion alive....id be playing same tunes on whatever instrument i could get my hands on
As to Bach...hes the daddy.....if he hadnt tempered the scale we wouldnt have them great jazz tunes that follow his rules ....Im not very adventurous really....break them rules and it no longer sounds like music to me....
Johnny....did cuddly Dudley work for your fire service too And Jozz...Im just confirming Ole! was a compliment..
 
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Geronimo

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maugein96 post_id=59923 time=1528500116 user_id=607 said:
Even here in the UK, English often fails to achieve the desired result of enabling us all to communicate accurately with each other, as dialects typically change every few miles, and that causes endless problems.
Well, there is a saying Germany and Austria differ by their common language here but you dont actually need to venture beyond Germanys borders for this effect.
I know that my attempts at humour sometimes appear off the wall, and are probably inappropriate in some situations.
Oh dont worry. The old German game of who first cracks a smile, loses is of course ridiculously easy in a written medium. Maybe I feel too much at home.
However, you do have a tendency to appear aggressive at times, even if that is not your intention. If it is a matter of translation then I do believe you have explained that in your last post, and I certainly wouldnt fancy having to communicate in any lingua franca other than English, even if Im not very adept in its use.
Oh, I have no problem coming across as an ass in German. Part of it is the engineering sickness of having to explain the world in the right terms or else. But then the chosen profession may be more the symptom than the affliction.
 
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maugein96

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Hi Geronimo,

I knew the situation about Austria, and it is in areas where the spoken language is markedly different from the written form that the people have most difficulty.

I have cousins in the US, and, despite the fact that some of them live in New Jersey and others in California, they have no trouble understanding each other, as any dialectal differences between them are minor. As you and I are both aware, the situation in Europe is very different, and you mention that you don't need to go outside of Germany to hear considerable differences in speech. Hawick, the town where I now live, has its own very distinct dialect, due to it being an isolated Scottish community near to the English border. I've lived there for 22 years and couldn't even begin to pronounce "their" version of English. It took me quite a while to learn that "Try tries" means "Three trees", and there is a ton of other local patois that nobody but they can really get to grips with. As soon as I try and communicate with local people I'm immediately identified as a "foreigner" from 150km away. We can understand each other most of the time, but it isn't always easy.

If I telephoned somebody in London they would have little or no chance of understanding me unless I kept repeating myself, and that gets a bit tedious, as I'm supposed to understand everything they say at the first listening, even if they have a thick London "cockney" accent. Cockney is closer to standard English than my version, so it takes precedence.

I therefore take my hat off to anybody like yourself, who is able to hold their own on a specialist forum in a foreign language.

This whole issue was caused by my failure to understand the OP correctly, and I probably felt a bit stupid that I had once again posted before I had taken the time to work things out. I made the wrong assumption that jozz's style was a modern trend, and you correctly identified that it was not.

My sarcastic and often satirical wit is seldom appreciated anywhere, but where I come from we are basically all the same. We are born with a big chip on our shoulder due to our geographical location and historical background, and often take any opportunity to have a dig at "proper" English, even when it is being used by a German!
 
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maugein96

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losthobos post_id=59929 time=1528522464 user_id=729 said:
Just thought id mention i play the old tunes to keep them alive rather than keep the accordion alive....id be playing same tunes on whatever instrument i could get my hands on
As to Bach...hes the daddy.....if he hadnt tempered the scale we wouldnt have them great jazz tunes that follow his rules ....Im not very adventurous really....break them rules and it no longer sounds like music to me....
Johnny....did cuddly Dudley work for your fire service too And Jozz...Im just confirming Ole! was a compliment..

Sorry Terry,

Started off bad and fell away with this one altogether. I read Ole! as a reply to another post, and obviously spoiled your intention to compliment jozz.

I used to think that Bach was a Welsh term of endearment, and Liszt was southern English slang for being inebriated.

Maybe I should read up a bit on music, as I could probably learn a lot and save myself a fair bit of embarrassment on here.

The only rule I know about music is that it is probably best not played at 3 in the morning in a built up area.

Do you reckon that Bach is possible on the spoons, just in case I crack up altogether and take a hammer to all of my accordions?

Cheers,

J.S. Walker (the S is for Sceptic, and not Sebastian!)
 
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maugein96

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Stephen,

If music really was the food of love, should we actually need forums about it?

It seems that forums are for fixing things, falling out, fighting, and all of those words are often preceded with another "f" word that my parents told me I shouldn't use.

When I was about 6 years old they told me the Queen lived at "Buckingham" Palace. I advised them that they didn't have to be polite about it and should just say it with the "F" in front of it instead of the "B", as all the older kids in the street had taught me how to say the word properly.

Unfortunately they taught me rather too well, as when I lived in Edinburgh in later life my work colleagues referred to me as "John F", and it wasn't a homage to John F Kennedy!
 
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Geronimo

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maugein96 post_id=60001 time=1528624830 user_id=607 said:
Stephen,

If music really was the food of love, should we actually need forums about it?

It seems that forums are for fixing things, falling out, fighting, and all of those words are often preceded with another f word that my parents told me I shouldnt use.
Mostly for filosofizing I fink.
 
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maugein96

Guest
Hi Geronimo,

I was actually amending the post when you posted your reply, but you're spot on. Where did you get that London cockney accent? As my granddaughter, who was born in Waltham Forest, London, would once have said, "Fanks for those fings grandad. I fought they were great".

She lost that accent at school here in Hawick, but I'm not really sure whether it was better or for worse, as at least cockney can be understood by millions, whereas the Hawick dialect is lost on all but the 20,000 or so people who can understand it.
 

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