• If you haven't done so already, please add a location to your profile. This helps when people are trying to assist you, suggest resources, etc. Thanks

Before I do something regretful, I'd like to ask about these

L

logista

Guest
Hello, Im so glad I found you all.

I have 2 accordions that my sister and I played when we were children. They were stored in a musty basement for over 25 years, so Im pretty sure theyre not worth fixing. However, before I tear them apart for collage and other stuff, I want to be sure that theyre not somehow interesting to someone as they are.

https://68.media.tumblr.com/d68aa2e5041480ddd9d1794ae75011d3/tumblr_oglfdwsCHs1qzt7lgo2_400.jpg>tumblr_oglfdwsCHs1qzt7lgo1_400.jpg
https://68.media.tumblr.com/5237be02f78b8360775ddcb61bd681cd/tumblr_oglfdwsCHs1qzt7lgo4_400.jpg>tumblr_oglfdwsCHs1qzt7lgo3_400.jpg

(In case the photos dont load for you, you can see them on my Tumblr post here)

The blue one is a Dorovi made in Italy (2415 is also marked on it). I think it was purchased new in the early 1970s but Im not positive.
The red one is a Nobility Accordion from Chicago, made in Italy. It was purchased used in the early 1970s.

Thank you in advance for any advice!
 

landro

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 12, 2015
Messages
252
Reaction score
1
You need to inspect the reeds . Rust on them will make them even worth less than they already were since they all appear to be novice grade instruments. I absolutely NEVER purchase accordions that come from a musty basement. Aside from rust on the reeds rendering the instrument near worthless , the musty stink is impossible to remove .
If these were given to me for free , I`d try to save any salvageable hardware and parts not subject or affected by the damp storage that was sure to ruin the instrument.
Surprisingly, sometimes the salvaged parts can be worth more than if you tried to sell the accordion in it`s entirety.
 

JerryPH

Been here for ages!
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 16, 2016
Messages
3,235
Reaction score
272
Location
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
To inspect the reeds is not a hard thing! You pull out the pins that attach the bellows to the accordion (make SURE you place them in a manner where you can return the exact same pin in the hole it was taken out of, this is important!). Once separated, you can see the reed blocks and take pictures. Post them here, people will give you an honest opinion of what it looks like, as best as the pictures can show things. :)
 
L

logista

Guest
Thanks for your responses! I'll pull these apart this weekend and report back.
 

Soulsaver

Been here for ages!
Site Supporter
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
4,335
Reaction score
4
It'll maybe interesting to see the innerds.. but whatever they are like inside they are worth scrap/break up value only.

They started life as pleasant enough student quality instruments, but after 25 years in a cellar and, in addition to the musty smell, both are damaged - sunken bass buttons in the 'red' & cracked casing (probably through the wood) in the bass section in the 'blue'.

I/we call this 'beyond economic repair' - because the cost of fixing them is well beyond the value realisable when fixed.

Thanks for the pics, they're always interesting. Best wishes in whatever you decide to do.

PS If you have respiratory issues wear a mask when working on them. Mould spores can aggravate.
 

JIM D.

Been here for ages!
Technical Adviser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 30, 2013
Messages
4,870
Reaction score
394
I must echo Ed's comments. For parts only.
 

Similar threads

Top