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Are accordions spread tuned like a piano?

DancerX

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So I just got my hands on an old accordion and am having some fun going through Palmer Hughes.
It's got a few funky bass notes, so after I replace some of the leather valves I'm thinking of spot tuning it.

In the past I've tuned a friends junky piano for fun and it sounded good when I spread tuned it.
The accordion does not have quite the range as a piano, but some of those bass notes go pretty low.
If I were to spread tune it maybe the lowest bass notes would be about 10 cents flat,
and maybe the highest note on the right hand side would be about 10 cents sharp.

Is this what is done? Or is tuning the accordion different from tuning the piano?

piano spread tune.gif
This is roughly what the graph of spread tuning looks like.

Here's the link I got that pic from that explains spread tuning :
The Equal Tempered Scale and Some Peculiarities of Piano Tuning
 

debra

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Typically accordions are not spread-tuned. Sure, it is ok (when tuning) to leave high-pitched notes just a tad too high and low-pitched notes just a tad too low, but tuning is not done with as much deviation as a piano. The main reason is that an accordion has LMH on a single note, so two octaves on one note, like A3+A4+A5 and that combination should sound completely dry (meaning that when A4 is 440Hz then A3 is exactly 220Hz and A5 exactly 880Hz, and not A3 just a bit lower and A5 just a bit higher). The only way to get all octaves to be completely dry-tuned is to not apply any spread. When A3 is 2 cents too low and A5 is 1 cent too high it already sounds bad enough so that I would never tune this way.
 

DancerX

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Well it certainly makes life easier not having to worry about spread tuning.

In the article it mentions that vibrating strings have harmonics that are a little sharp of the natural harmonic series.
I guess I was wondering if this applied to vibrating reeds as well.

Spread tuning appears to be a compromise between beating of the octaves and having the harmonics sound good as the note rings out.
It occurs to me that the trade offs may be different between a piano and an accordion, since to me, beating is much more noticeable in an accordion.
 

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