• If you haven't done so already, please add a location to your profile. This helps when people are trying to assist you, suggest resources, etc. Thanks

Always something new under the sun!πŸ˜€

cat

Active member
Joined
Jul 23, 2013
Messages
183
Reaction score
49
I (guitarist) was influenced by Michael Hedges back in the 80s. Seeing a photo of him with a Dyer harp guitar, I felt I had to get one. Well I never did, as I went on to become a harper instead - which assuaged "the sound."

This begins to explain it (the compulsion/obsession) -

 

JIM D.

Been here for ages!
Technical Adviser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 30, 2013
Messages
4,868
Reaction score
391
I've always been fascinated & entertained by the sound of stringed instruments. The ones with a lesser number of strings
especially intrigue me such as a concert violinist, and another instrument with 4 strings such as ----
 
Last edited:

Sean

Member
Joined
May 1, 2021
Messages
23
Reaction score
25
Location
Texas, USA
Thanks for sharing these videos! I'll jump in: I recently learned of fretted microtonal guitars - even models made with Legos. Fascinating!

Any (intentionally πŸ˜…) microtonal accordions out there? Or accordions with unique musical temperaments?

 

Jim2010

Active member
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 13, 2015
Messages
174
Reaction score
41
Location
Florida, USA
I've always been fascinated & entertained by the sound of stringed instruments. The ones with a lesser number of strings
especially intrigue me such as a concert violinist, and another instrument with 4 strings such as ----
Jim, here is The Washington Post played on ukulele.
 

Siegmund

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2021
Messages
51
Reaction score
34
Location
Montana, USA
Thanks for sharing these videos! I'll jump in: I recently learned of fretted microtonal guitars - even models made with Legos. Fascinating!

Any (intentionally πŸ˜…) microtonal accordions out there? Or accordions with unique musical temperaments?

A subject near and dear to my heart too. Being able to play in the temperament of one's choice without re-fretting is one of the advantages of the violin (and of computer-generated sound) that I wish was easier to apply to other instruments.

It seems to me that something like Eivind Groven's microtonal organ should be possible for the accordion. (12 keys per octave, connected to 36 pipes per octave, via a selector that, essentially, asks you what the current tonic is. We have the usual 12 equally tempered tonics to choose from. The tonic, major second, fourth, and fifth are left alone. The major third, sixth, and seventh are flattened 20 cents. The minor third, sixth, and seventh raised by 20 cents. I don't happen to recall what he does with the tritone and minor second - I would guess lowers the former and raises the latter so that D-F# is a purer major third and C-Db is wider than Db-D, when in C.) We already have LMMM accordions - "all" we need to do is add a new kind of register plate, that opens the appropriate combo of M holes.

But I've never seen one. (Nor have people built very many copies of Groven's original organ - all the modern replicas I know of use electronics to automatically apply the pitch bends, not mechanical linkages to sharpened and flattened pipes.)

And, for those of you unfamiliar - Groven is a much underrated 20th century composer. He collected Norwegian folk tunes, sort of the way Bartok did in eastern Europe, as well as writing pleasant tonal music in the standard tuning for full orchestra and brass band.
 

Dingo40

Been here for ages!
Joined
Nov 27, 2017
Messages
2,274
Reaction score
829
Location
South Australia
Sean,
Any (intentionally πŸ˜…) microtonal accordions out there? Or accordions with unique musical temperaments?
I seem to remember a post about microtonally tuned accordion being the very thing amongst the Arab musicians.
Perhaps one or our Arab members can remind us of how that works?🀫
 
Last edited:

Dingo40

Been here for ages!
Joined
Nov 27, 2017
Messages
2,274
Reaction score
829
Location
South Australia
Here's one!πŸ™‚:
A quarter tone is a pitch halfway between the usual notes of a chromatic scale or an interval about half as wide as a semitone, which itself is half a whole tone. Quarter tones divide the octave by 50 cents each, and have 24 different pitches. Wikipedia
 
Last edited:

Sean

Member
Joined
May 1, 2021
Messages
23
Reaction score
25
Location
Texas, USA
Here's one!πŸ™‚:
A quarter tone is a pitch halfway between the usual notes of a chromatic scale or an interval about half as wide as a semitone, which itself is half a whole tone. Quarter tones divide the octave by 50 cents each, and have 24 different pitches. Wikipedia
Thanks, Dingo! This is fascinating. As always, I learn so much on this forum.

Siegmund - I’ll listen to Groven’s work, thanks. I notice there are a few YouTube demonstrating his microtonal organ..
 

Similar threads

Top