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Aluminium reed switch broke/is missing | How can I repair it?

Adrian13sk

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Hello fellow accordion players!

I am an owner of an older accordion, to be more exact, it's Weltmeister Meteor (although with its design it resembles Royal Standard Silvana), 96 bass type with 4 voices and I have so far unfixable problem with it.

As in pictures attached, the aluminium switch inside broke, which my fellow accordion repairer managed to fix, but the other one, that is missing he could not repair. So far I've been searching for repair parts, but I was unlucky. That's why I am asking for your help regarding this unpleasant manner as the accordion cannot reach its full potential.

I'd be very grateful for any tips!
 

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debra

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You will not likely find this exact piece. It looks like it is fairly easy to make from a scrap piece of metal. The main problem will be connecting it to the register slider. You are likely going to need a thin strip of aluminium to first rivet to the register slider and then bend into a 90 degree angle and then rivet to the new piece that looks like the one from your second image. It's going to be a bit of delicate metal work, but it's not really something that absolutely requires an accordion repair person to do.
 

Dingo40

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Adrian,
Paul's right, you don't absolutely need an accordion technician, you need a skilled and versatile metal worker who's willing to think outside the box, like a tinkerer or gifted handyman. Someone able and willing to make a replica part from a piece of scrap metal ( as Paul says) and not dependent on parts from stock.πŸ™‚
 

boxplayer4000

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Adrian,
Helpful, skilled metal working people, can often be found in model makers clubs and associations. In this neck of the woods (U.K.) they are often to be found making steam engines etc.
 

Pipemajor

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Adrian,
Helpful, skilled metal working people, can often be found in model makers clubs and associations. In this neck of the woods (U.K.) they are often to be found making steam engines etc.
Here's one my pal and fellow squeeze box addict made. Every part excluding the "engineer" he made on a lathe in his garage. He would knock that up in a couple of minutes:)
 

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oldbayan

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A few years back I had a big 4-voice Weltmeister with broken register switches, but the previous owner had simply removed all of the original flat aluminum switch sliders, put 4 rods that were attached to the pivoting levers at their lower ends, and stuck out through the top of the treble section, with their ends bent into a L shape, covered with those plastic screw thread protectors! I had 4 little "switches" I could use to select any reed set from the top of the treble section.
 

Adrian13sk

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Thank you everybody for great tips! πŸ™

So I figured out how to repair it. I found myself a thin metal sheet, where I have made a small line on the top (as the other ones in the pictures). Then I dissasembled the switch mechanism, and I glued the reed switch to the molding. I assembled it all back together, the mechanism works as it should, but I figured out, that the glue I used is too weak, because when the switch mechanism is attached to the accordion, it isn't able to open/close the reeds, to be more specific, the bottom moves but the top stays. In order to make it workable, I need to use different type of glue, which needs to be way stronger.

If I succeed, I will inform you! πŸ˜‰
 

debra

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Thank you everybody for great tips! πŸ™

So I figured out how to repair it. I found myself a thin metal sheet, where I have made a small line on the top (as the other ones in the pictures). Then I dissasembled the switch mechanism, and I glued the reed switch to the molding. I assembled it all back together, the mechanism works as it should, but I figured out, that the glue I used is too weak, because when the switch mechanism is attached to the accordion, it isn't able to open/close the reeds, to be more specific, the bottom moves but the top stays. In order to make it workable, I need to use different type of glue, which needs to be way stronger.

If I succeed, I will inform you! πŸ˜‰
It's hard to connect metal pieces with a glue strong enough for the forces in a register mechanism. A connecting metal piece and some rivets may be a better solution (with or without some additional glue).
 

boxplayer4000

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Adrian,
It may be silly to suggest it but the reason the lever broke in the first place is perhaps because the metal slide that it pulls back and forward may be stuck/ sticking/ or otherwise obstructing the movement of the lever that you are repairing.
 

Dingo40

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Adrian,
There are many types of rivet.
See here:
I would be considering a solid, flat headed tinner's rivet. If the join can be made prior to installation.
They are very secure and easy to use: all you need is a hammer, a solid (preferably steel) surface for an anvil and a drill to make the hole it sits in.
See here:
In this video, the guy is using a rivet to join leather but the principle is the same when joining metal.
Also, he's using a dome headed rivet.
If using a flat headed rivet, you can rest it on a plain, flat surface.
Also, you wouldn't need to use the washers, just the rivet. πŸ™‚
 
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Glug

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You might get away with single cap rivets such as used for securing the end plate on bass straps:

I just tighten it in a vice to flatted it fully and that gives better results than hitting it with the setter.
 

Dingo40

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Another take:
 

oldbayan

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If a rivet is going to create friction between the plates, SuperGlue (cyanoacrylate) when well applied can give good results.
I once had the challenge to re-connect a wood stop key with an aluminum slider in a cheap cajun accordion, and SuperGlue succeeded where epoxy failed.
 

debra

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If a rivet is going to create friction between the plates, SuperGlue (cyanoacrylate) when well applied can give good results.
I once had the challenge to re-connect a wood stop key with an aluminum slider in a cheap cajun accordion, and SuperGlue succeeded where epoxy failed.
In the ACA course (Tier 3) we changed the function of registers by altering the tabs by means of thin pieces of (scrap) aluminium. They were riveted onto the register sliders and made so thin that they would not cause any friction in the register mechanism. It takes a bit of patience and effort (in filing down the finished rivets so they are less than 1/2mm thick) but the result is flawless.
 

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