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Almost a CBA?πŸ€”

JIM D.

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"OOP'S" Might have irritated some CBA players here. CBA"s are not in any way Concertinas.
 

dunlustin

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The more inquisitive might want to know if we are talking about an English Concertina or a Duet Concertina - and in that case whether it is a MacCann, Crane or Hayden system. None of these would fall into the 'tin whistle' category.
 

Tom

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The Chemnitzer is THE traditional "accordion" instrument in western Wisconsin, called a "concertina" and played for "Old Time" music of waltzes, polkas, schottiches, etc. I have never tried one, because new ones are very expensive and beaters are not commonly found, as are piano accordions and small diatonics, also here called "concertinas."

The bands are often called "Dutchmen," because of their German heritage. Although the (Chemnitzer) concertina has been likened to a "tin flute," they are rather complex and in the hands of a master, can make some pretty fine music.

Here's Karl's Country Dutchmen:

 
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JIM D.

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The words 'Tin Flute & Clarinet' were only used in the same context as comparing 'Apples to Oranges.'
Just a substitution of musical instruments in place of fruits for comparison.
 
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Tom

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Thanks for the clarification, Jim
 

Chrisrayner

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why would you call them 'Dutchmen' if they are German descendants? :unsure:
The Germans call themselves β€˜Deutsch’. The population of Pennsylvania and neighbouring areas who are of German descent are known as the Pennsylavania Dutch. The noun Germany relates to the similarity of the combination of states and principalities which were amalgamated to form Germany In the 19th century. The word derives from Julius Caesarβ€˜s description of tribes he met in the northern part of Europe, as distinct from the Gauls.
 

jozz

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thanks for the history

I just came to complain about people ranking our πŸ‡³πŸ‡± tribe with the Germans
 
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Tom

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Because "Gary and the Ridgeland Orange" sounds funny.
 

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