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Accordion on a Raft

Eddy Yates

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Recently returned from a 5-day float on Montana’s beautiful Smith River. One of the joys was that both my raft mate and me don’t feel the need to fill up the quiet moments on the river with jabber, so we both enjoyed the spectacular quiet as well as the bird and water sounds.
However, around the campfire, there were times that an accordion would have been entertaining and comforting (especially when bears had been reported in the area.)
I have 2 questions. 1:Any suggestions for a small “campfire P.A.?” 2: Rafts are low to the water and get splashed, dumping into the river occasionally occurs, and rain is a sometime thing, What’s an effective water-proof carrier? They make River Bags that are waterproof but I haven’t found one big enough for an accordion.
 

JIM D.

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JeffJetton

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The new Hohner XS might fit the bill. Small, light, and mostly plastic.

It's expensive (for what you get) though, so maybe a "beater" 48-bass would be better. I have a Hohner Student 48 that's my go-to "picnic" accordion.

All that said, metal reeds and paper bellows don't always mix well with water. This probably isn't the forum in which to suggest it, but it sounds to me like you've got more of a ukulele sort of situation going on. They're lighter and (depending on the kind you get) more weather-tolerant. And still a lot of fun around the campfire!
 

Chrisrayner

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Mouthorgan. Possibly an old cheap single row diatonic button accordion. If you must have a piano keyboard then a Melodica. You could get a small cheap electronic keyboard. I would prefer to avoid electronic devices in a watery setting.
 

Eddy Yates

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The new Hohner XS might fit the bill. Small, light, and mostly plastic.

It's expensive (for what you get) though, so maybe a "beater" 48-bass would be better. I have a Hohner Student 48 that's my go-to "picnic" accordion.

All that said, metal reeds and paper bellows don't always mix well with water. This probably isn't the forum in which to suggest it, but it sounds to me like you've got more of a ukulele sort of situation going on. They're lighter and (depending on the kind you get) more weather-tolerant. And still a lot of fun around the campfire!
That’s no fun! Besides, I can’t play the ukulele.
 

cat

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There was a hohner amati on ebay a couple of weeks ago. Personally I have a couple of small acrdns for going light. (FWIW, it's been my experience that acrdns tend to attract fauna . . . )
 

Ventura

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i think this may be the one and only time
i actually nominate a Honica

without a waterproof case

i mean, if it does go overboard, so what !

but seriously, there are plenty of $100 student accordions around that
still play well enough, but have chafed bellows corners and
other things that make them not worth serious repair work...
just a few hours of spot repair

for example, i have an old white Excelsior that i use only for winter
strolling in support of carolers and such.. in the snow whatever..
sure i dry off the reeds before they condense moisture and
rust, but if it gets ruined sometime won't hurt my feelings at all
 

Eddy Yates

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A $100 accordion that still plays sounds good to me. I can put it in the dry bag that Jim D suggested and attract much fauna. We had a bear across from our campground on the last trip and a moose in the middle of the river.
 

cat

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Like Jeff mentioned, a pot on a stick makes a good rustic instrument. You could even go au naturale and put gut strings on it (doesnt smell as much if it catches fire).

Everyone can play a uke/banjer/dulcimer. . . and colleagues can accompany by beating on rocks without harming the music. ;) Additionally, of course they can be used as a paddle, in a pinch.
 

Eddy Yates

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I KNEW I could count on the adroit forum members to pull me through! Anything to get my boat mates to dance around the campfire and scare off the bears.
 

pentaprism

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How about another free-reed instrument?

My Anglo concertina came in a water-proof storm case. The concertina itself weighs about 2.5 lbs. The whole thing, case and concertina, weighs a bit over 7 lbs.

If I had to bring an accordion, it would be the little Pigini (bought for $100 when I just started out on CBA).

IMG-1533.JPG

IMG-1532.JPG
 
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cat

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and that ebay amati went for under $299. I was going to buy it and put the bass end on a hohner diatonic box. Too lazy though.....🧠
 

Eddy Yates

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How about another free-reed instrument?

My Anglo concertina came in a water-proof storm case. The concertina itself weighs about 2.5 lbs. The whole thing, case and concertina, weighs a bit over 7 lbs.

If I had to bring an accordion, it would be the little Pigini (bought for $100 when I just started out on CBA).

View attachment 3666

View attachment 3667
Beautiful! Did you buy that new or did the previous owner buy the case?
 

cat

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Also, thermal cases (beer coolers :rolleyes:) make great concertina travel solutions. These offer the additional protection from sun/heat - and no need for a dry bag.

Also, dont forget the English (or duet) concertinas. I play anglo for irish, but English for everything else..

And also again, http://forum.melodeon.net/index.php?topic=13352.0
 
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Casey.E

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My two cents. I did a bit of testing using my 48 bass and a 44 Litre dry bag and i couldn't manage to get it to fit. A 55 Litre bag may be a little better but still doubt it. Sorry if that scuppers your plans.
 

cat

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I have a good old Hohner 114 (black) that I keep on hand in the hopes that someone will come along and accompany me (I play some cajun fiddle). Sounds great, but I never play it; my melodeon playing is relegated to 3-row. (Even have a nice waterproof "cooler" for it ;) ). I couldn't say it was a "cheap" beater though..

Have you ever thought about a 2 or 3 row? Or do you already play one? For knocking out tunes in a compact and lightweight kit, really can't beat em..
 
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