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A lot from a little!

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maugein96

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Hi Dingo,

You've really got the Brazilian vibe. Must be the heat over there! Looks pretty scary, and hope you aren't too badly affected.

Here in the UK we're also experiencing a heatwave. Think we reached double figures on the Celsius scale recently and we had to turn the central heating down a bit.

My sister in Norway tells me it has been milder than usual there, and people are catching all sorts of bugs the cold weather would normally have taken care of.

We've currently got 9c in our part of the UK, but we haven't seen the sun much for quite a few days.

Doubt whether we'll get a Brazilian summer, but you never know these days!

Nice clip again, thanks.
 

Dingo40

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John,
Thanks for your value added response! :)

Yes, the summer, this year, has been hotter than other years, and the fires more numerous, but not all Australia is afire, and in many places you'd hardly  know there was a problem.

I guess it's similar to a war: unless you're at the front or directly involved in some way you wouldn't necessarily be concerned about it the whole day long.
Luckily, we've been well out of it! :)

I must say, the Brazilian music has it's appeal, though I'll always be a listener, never a player. Still, one can always appreciate the roses in another's garden! :)
 
M

maugein96

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Dingo40 said:
John,
Thanks for your value added response! :)

Yes, the summer, this year, has been hotter than other years, and the fires more numerous, but not all Australia is afire, and in many places you'd hardly  know there was a problem.

I guess it's similar to a war: unless you're at the front or directly involved in some way you wouldn't necessarily be concerned about it the whole day long.
Luckily, we've been well out of it! :)

I must say, the Brazilian music has it's appeal, though I'll always be a listener, never a player. Still, one can always appreciate the roses in another's garden! :)

Hi Dingo,

I know what you mean. The UK is regularly affected by bad floods, but I've never lived anywhere near a flood plain. Our current house is 660 feet above sea level, so we should have nothing to fear. 

It took me many years to realise that you can't just dabble in loads of different styles and expect to make a decent job of playing them all. 

A lot of Brazilian bossa and samba generated "international" hits, and those of us in the English speaking world got used to listening to "our" versions of them. When you listen to a Brazilian player you realise that our popular versions appear to have been "topped and tailed" to suit our more staid musical tastes. 

I've never made a study of it, but traditional music of the world tends to reflect the character of the people who play it. Our Northern European efforts are pretty straight up and down the middle with anything too fancy being met with a scowl, or even worse. 

I was visiting my sister in Crete some years ago, when I heard the local bowed instrument, the lyra being played. The haunting melodies of the Ottoman Empire were oozing out of the music, and it made a refreshing change from the plainer fare offered in the UK.

The fact that the player was an Irishman named Ross Daly came as a bit of a shock. He had moved there and immersed himself in the music to the point where he is one of the most revered lyra players on Crete. It inspired me to move to France and become a great musette accordion player, but the wife and kids weren't really up for it. Shame that, as I was really looking forward to it. 

As you say, there is no point in even attempting to tackle a lot of what you hear. Best to just sit back and enjoy it.
 

Dingo40

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John,
It's amazing how many Brits/Irish become influential experts/citizens in foreign countries: there must be dozens in the highest ranks: explorers, linguists, historians, scientists, engineers...the list is unending!

I do agree with your observation regarding the music of different peoples reflecting their national characters. I think, too, the more cruel their history, frequently the more "soulful ", whistful, and " tender" the music. Consider the Russians and the Gypsies for instance: they hardly come more soulful than that! :)
 
M

maugein96

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Dingo40 pid=69043 dateline=1578133504 said:
John,
Its amazing how many Brits/Irish become influential experts/citizens in foreign countries: there must be dozens in the highest ranks: explorers, linguists, historians, scientists, engineers...the list is unending!

I do agree with your observation regarding the music of different peoples reflecting their national characters. I think, too, the more cruel their history, frequently the more soulful , whistful, and tender the music. Consider the Russians and the Gypsies for instance: they hardly come more soulful than that! :)

Dingo,

Dont know what sort of history there is here, and I would be frightened to ask at my age. Parental control was on, honest!


No problem here. Hes never seen an angry man (or a Stradella bass system!)

 

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