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A good tuner

oldbayan

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I have performed extensive work on old accordions lately, and tuning is always a very time consuming activity. I used to use a Peterson StroboPlus tuner, but recently got my hands on an old original electro-mechanical Peterson model 500 strobe tuner from the 70's. It's huge compared to today's electronic tuners (or phones with tuning software) but it's fun to use! It came with a little microphone, it also has an audio function to generate tones. It supports an amazing range of 8 octaves of frequencies, suitable to pianos, from about 32 Hz to over 7900. Each note can be adjusted to +/- 50 cents.
 

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debra

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A great relic from the past! Modern software tuners detect notes automatically and quickly which makes them faster in use, but sometimes they may pick up the wrong note (often an overtone) so you need to check that it shows the correct one, and you need to sample at 48000 Hz and not 44.100 or else you cannot tune C#8 (highest reed that exists)... so there is certainly still a good use for a good old-fashioned tuner.
 

oldbayan

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A great relic from the past! Modern software tuners detect notes automatically and quickly which makes them faster in use, but sometimes they may pick up the wrong note (often an overtone) so you need to check that it shows the correct one, and you need to sample at 48000 Hz and not 44.100 or else you cannot tune C#8 (highest reed that exists)... so there is certainly still a good use for a good old-fashioned tuner.
Agreed!

Modern software can indeed detect harmonics and partial harmonics and this is very handy, but the freebie tuner apps and most handheld electronic tuners are geared towards guitar tuning and most do not get that level of sophistication. The disc on those old strobe tuners have patterns that can show harmonics, and there is also an "image clarifier" switch which is a cut-off filter which eliminates upper partials from the display.

When, like most people, you have used small electronic tuners or apps and then use one of these old strobe tuners, you feel like you have been cheated all your life and just discovered what real tuning is about :oops:

The top-of-the-line Peterson tuner has 12 discs to show all notes and harmonics but it costs USD 5000! So you need to have to do lots of tuning to make it cost effective.
 

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NickC

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Nice! I used one of these about 20 years ago at a studio session that I played on bass. I wanted one ever since, but never went for it. I use a Peterson clip on tuner now.
 

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