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2/2 time signature

FireSpirit

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Hello guys!
I can easily play the basses in 3/4 or 4/4 because I make 1 bass for 1 quarter note. However, at 2/2 1 bass = 1 quarter note does not work. Apparently, 1 quarter note = 1 eighth note How do I play the basses at 2/2?
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Dingo40

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Personally, I just play it like 4/4, giving the "quarter notes" a single beat!🙂
Or, you could count the quarter notes as 1 and, two and?🤔
 
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debra

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Personally, I just play it like 4/4, giving the "quarter notes" a single beat!🙂
Or, you could count the quarter notes as 1 and, two and?🤔
Or alternatively when it goes fast enough, just pretend it is 2/4 and that all the note values are half of what is written down.
 

dunlustin

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You have a suggested bass pattern in the music (bass clef).
How about following that - to simplify just use the bass note for the indicated chord or chord only or the 2 'stabbed' together?
I'm not sure oom-pah is right here?
 

Tom

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Another idea would be to listen to how others play it, probably available on youtube.....
 

wirralaccordion

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I would do as Dingo says and play all bass notes/chords as minims, so the first 4 bars would be D,Dm,D,Dm, G,Gm,G,Gm and so it would be a slow oom-pah
 

JeffJetton

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I'm with @dunlustin.

This is a hymn, so I'd play it the way an organist would. That is, as close as possible to what's written there, without any sort of oom-pah or "stride" rhythmic LH pattern.

Heck, you could just play single bass notes (no chord buttons) in time with the RH part. It's sort of a modal song anyway, and I'm not convinced that the printed chords really work in all parts of the measure anyway.
 

FireSpirit

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You have a suggested bass pattern in the music (bass clef).
How about following that - to simplify just use the bass note for the indicated chord or chord only or the 2 'stabbed' together?
I'm not sure oom-pah is right here?
I'm with @dunlustin.

This is a hymn, so I'd play it the way an organist would. That is, as close as possible to what's written there, without any sort of oom-pah or "stride" rhythmic LH pattern.

Heck, you could just play single bass notes (no chord buttons) in time with the RH part. It's sort of a modal song anyway, and I'm not convinced that the printed chords really work in all parts of the measure anyway.
Thanks for your answers.
This is the song in piano. Although, I think you can play "organist style" (holding the notes in the bass, right?), It seems to me more that it is oom-pah style ... Maybe I am mistaken. I remember Dingo40, another post of mine saying to play as an organist style too but I never understood how to "sustain" the bass correctly. If I scan another hymn, could you demonstrate to me what it would be like? (I apologize if my request is unpleasant or against the rules. I have a serious problem, many happy hymns I can play... but when it comes to reflective/meditative hymns I just can't do it without making him happy.)

Personally, I just play it like 4/4, giving the "quarter notes" a single beat!🙂
Or, you could count the quarter notes as 1 and, two and?🤔
Or alternatively when it goes fast enough, just pretend it is 2/4 and that all the note values are half of what is written down.
I will try, thanks!
 
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Chrisrayner

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I think there is no correct answer here. Notation is, after all, only a partial description of music. That’s why you can‘t learn to play music by correspondence course. My own view is that the key difference between 2/4 and 4/4 is mainly of emphasis. There is a slight, but noticeable difference in emphasis on the first beat of each bar. Thus 2/4 goes OOm pah, OOm pah, while 4/4 goes OOm pah pah pah, OOm pah pah pah. There are, of course, many variations which merge imperceptibly into each other. In particular, hornpipes are frequently written in 4/4 metre, but if you listen to one, for those unfamiliar the well known Sailors’ Hornpipe will serve as an example, the emphasis mostly falls on beats 1 and 3, and in some bars all four beats are emphasised, and in yet others Beats 1, 2 & 3. I think it has to do with the dance associated.

Rum old business music. Part of what keeps it endlessly fascinating
 

wirralaccordion

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Hi FireSpirit,

I have played your music sheet as per Dingo and then as per Jeff Jetton. I think in practice it would be good to use both ( and more ) so as to give a bit of variety your playing. It depends if you are playing solo or if you are part of a band.


God bless,
Phil
 

FireSpirit

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Hi FireSpirit,

I have played your music sheet as per Dingo and then as per Jeff Jetton. I think in practice it would be good to use both ( and more ) so as to give a bit of variety your playing. It depends if you are playing solo or if you are part of a band.


God bless,
Phil
Thanks, Phil! You play very well! I just wanted to ask a question, about Jeff's way, which way did you do it? Did you sustain the chord with each measure or did you sustain the chord according to the F clef or did you sustain each key note as written in the F clef?
God bless you and your family!!
 

wirralaccordion

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Hi FireSpirit,

Jeff's way would be to play it to the music as written. Therefore, the bass button presses are per the F clef and the first 4 bars would have twice as many button presses as below ( 4 to the bar instead of 2 ):

D,Dm,D,Dm,D,Dm,D,Dm,G,Gm,G,Gm,G,Gm,G,Gm where D = the root note D and Dm = the D minor chord

IMHO this makes the overall effect a bit "bottom heavy" but on the other hand would sound better if played a little slower.

This song is a bit like "You shall go out with joy", also Slany Plac.

Phil
 

JeffJetton

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This is the song in piano. Although, I think you can play "organist style" (holding the notes in the bass, right?), It seems to me more that it is oom-pah style ... Maybe I am mistaken.

Well I stand corrected now that I hear an interpretation of the tune. It's a lot faster and peppier than that I would've guessed based on the notated music, and not nearly as organ-like.

So if that's the way you prefer to play it, that is definitely oom-pah style. Something that would normally be notated in 2/4, with the bass part being eighth notes. Not sure why they "multiplied" everything by two and put it in 2/2.
 

FireSpirit

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Hi FireSpirit,

Jeff's way would be to play it to the music as written. Therefore, the bass button presses are per the F clef and the first 4 bars would have twice as many button presses as below ( 4 to the bar instead of 2 ):

D,Dm,D,Dm,D,Dm,D,Dm,G,Gm,G,Gm,G,Gm,G,Gm where D = the root note D and Dm = the D minor chord

IMHO this makes the overall effect a bit "bottom heavy" but on the other hand would sound better if played a little slower.

This song is a bit like "You shall go out with joy", also Slany Plac.

Phil
Thanks for your attention and your patience in explaining, Phil! Your attention has been uplifting for me.
Sorry to ask you again, but I need to confirm. I made a drawing in Paint about what is the "organist style of playing" in the accordion, to play hymns.
I am asking more than once why in my church I will need to play along with flutes, violins and piano and I need to learn to play in a band, without playing in a very "rhythmic" way. I illustrated two scores, which way is the organist way? The red one or the green or the blue? (The second sheet "356" is I'd Rather Have Jesus and "317" is Day By Day in portuguese) (the green is hold the root note)
1.jpgJesus É Melhor_Página_1.jpgdigitalizar0002.jpg

I found a video of a guy who plays It Is Well With My Soul in a more "organist" way. But I didn't understand the pattern he used there on the bass, or if it was an arrangement.
Well I stand corrected now that I hear an interpretation of the tune. It's a lot faster and peppier than that I would've guessed based on the notated music, and not nearly as organ-like.

So if that's the way you prefer to play it, that is definitely oom-pah style. Something that would normally be notated in 2/4, with the bass part being eighth notes. Not sure why they "multiplied" everything by two and put it in 2/2.
Thanks, Jeff!
I also didn't understand why they put it in 2/2, being the 2/4 better to understand. Perhaps because it is a SATB sheet
 
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wirralaccordion

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Hi FireSpirit,

It was Jeff who defined the organist style of playing as follows:

"This is a hymn, so I'd play it the way an organist would. That is, as close as possible to what's written there, without any sort of oom-pah or "stride" rhythmic LH pattern".

The hymn Jesus E Melor is one where the lyrics take over from the music. When George Beverly Shea sang it the timing was of no consequence such was the power of his voice. I can imagine that people could weep as the message got across, even before Billy Graham spoke. This hymn would not IMHO lend itself to congregational singing.

The hymns played on the video are played for performance and in a different sort of way are also played in a way that accompaniament by singing is not intended.

Hence your choice of bass depends very much on the environment you are in. It's a matter of what sounds best but playing what's within your capabilities.

BTW that guy on the video is a super player. I wish I could understand what he's saying! Thanks for showing that.

Sorry if I haven't answered your questions.
 

JeffJetton

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I am asking more than once why in my church I will need to play along with flutes, violins and piano and I need to learn to play in a band, without playing in a very "rhythmic" way.

This is a good question and a very common one! (There have been other threads here about it.)

You are correct that a single person playing accordion by themselves would play a song one way. But the same person playing the same song with a band of other instruments might want to play the same song in a totally different way. It is a different situation, with different demands.

There is not one single "correct" answer on how to do this though. In general, it is better to play less. Let the other players have a place where they can contribute to the music--don't "hog the ball". :) Beyond that, it is your musical choice and what sounds good to you.

But here's a place to start: If you are playing songs from a book of hymns (like you've posted here), try just playing the treble clef with your right hand. Don't play the left hand at all! That instantly solves the puzzle of what pattern to play. See if you like how that sounds.
 

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