Question about treble switches ..
#1
I purchased a Titan accordion recently that has 3 Treble switches. Master, Bassoon and Clarinet. Normally I push only one switch to play but I decided to see if 2 switches together would work. I pushed the Bassoon and Clarinet together gently and it played just fine with a muted sound (No resistance) . Sorry for the stupid question , but is this normal or should I not do this? As you can tell I'm not very experienced. Just and old timer with lots of time !! lol   Huh
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#2
Hi, BF,
Short answer is: no! Never actuate two or more coupler switches simultaneously,
As they would be working against each other (as in applying the brake and accelerator simultaneously) and something is liable to break! Undecided

I'm sure Paul DeBra can give you a more definitive answer! Smile
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#3
When you pressed the bassoon and clarinet together you have managed to open two slides ever slightly. In this situation
two banks of reeds are sounding with only a small amount of air flow. This small amount of air pressure will cause the reeds to sound out of tune.
Think of these slides as gates, when opened fully a correct amount of air flow will feed the reed bank. Some switches will open more than one slide but will open them fully. In your case you have opened two slides only partially.The bandoneon switch on your Titan will cause the bassoon and clarinet slides to open fully and together.
Owner & Operator "THE FISARMONICA SHOP" Chicopee, MA USA
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#4
(23-06-2020, 12:51 AM)BellowFellow Wrote: I purchased a Titan accordion recently that has 3 Treble switches. Master, Bassoon and Clarinet. Normally I push only one switch to play but I decided to see if 2 switches together would work. I pushed the Bassoon and Clarinet together gently and it played just fine with a muted sound (No resistance) . Sorry for the stupid question , but is this normal or should I not do this? As you can tell I'm not very experienced. Just and old timer with lots of time !! lol   Huh

Pressing both together is a really bad idea because of the danger of damaging the mechanism.
But... there are two things you can do without damage:
1) When you press Master (which is Bassoon+Clarinet) and after that you gently "half-press" the Clarinet that will partly close the holes for the Bassoon. This will cause the Bassoon to be deprived of air and go down a bit in frequency, creating a tremolo effect. The result is a strong Clarinet with a weaker tremolo from the Bassoon.
2) When you press Master and after that you gently "half-press" the Bassoon that will partly close the holes for the Clarinet. This will cause the Clarinet to be deprived of air and go down in frequency, creating a tremolo effect. The result is a strong Bassoon with a weaker tremolo from the Clarinet.
Whether any of these choices produces a usable (nice sounding) effect depends on whether the slides under the different reed blocks partly close *equally*. If not then the tremolo for the white keys will be different from that of the black keys and that won't be so nice.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#5
After I posted the question I realized how stupid it was! I was pretty sure it was the wrong thing to do and have not done it since. Everything everyone described is what I was getting.  I probably should not be posting to the forum, I'm sure it was designed for the experienced Accordionists and not for silly stuff like this - Sorry .  Blush

Many Thanks for the replys !!
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#6
1. No such thing as a silly question.
2. Full marks for curiosity.
3. The very competent Paul D says it's OK to 'half press' a register - so at worst you were only being a bit silly!
Keep trying new stuff I say.
Richard
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#7
(23-06-2020, 08:16 PM)dunlustin Wrote: 1. No such thing as a silly question.
2. Full marks for curiosity.
3. The very competent Paul D says it's OK to 'half press' a register - so at worst you were only being a bit silly!
                                             Keep trying new stuff I say.

It was certainly not silly. People who have dry-tuned accordions (like most professional convertor instruments) sometimes use a half-press trick to get a bit of tremolo. This is typically done with the MM register. They press MM first and then half-press M (which deprives the other M from air).
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pboMqfYrECY

The excelsior "00" or four rocker was used extensively to mimic this variable air flow effect. The four rocker switches, one each for L M M H could produce many air flow variations to accomplish different tremolo effects.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pboMqfYrECY
Owner & Operator "THE FISARMONICA SHOP" Chicopee, MA USA
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#9
All progress comes from asking "silly " questions! Smile
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#10
OK a similar question: sometimes I start playing and don't realize that NONE of the switches are activated. Not sure how this happens.

I don't mind the sound but am unable to recreate it. I can't "unswitch" it. What is going on exactly?
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#11
(23-06-2020, 08:42 PM)debra Wrote:
(23-06-2020, 08:16 PM)dunlustin Wrote: 1. No such thing as a silly question.
2. Full marks for curiosity.
3. The very competent Paul D says it's OK to 'half press' a register - so at worst you were only being a bit silly!
                                             Keep trying new stuff I say.

It was certainly not silly. People who have dry-tuned accordions (like most professional convertor instruments) sometimes use a half-press trick to get a bit of tremolo. This is typically done with the MM register. They press MM first and then half-press M (which deprives the other M from air).

Heck, I often do the opposite: Press my M then half-press the MM so that my regular MM (which is tuned very wet) comes off a bit drier.
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